women

Study finds women use carsharing less than men

By Robert Benner A recent study out of Transportation Research Procedia has found that women are less likely than men to use carsharing services due to childcare, household duties, and the need to make “chain trips” across multiple destinations for a variety of errands. Even in Germany—the

Living near a major roadway raises risk of cardiac death in women

By Robbie Webber A paper published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, outlines the dangers for women’s health of living near major roadways. Researchers following a group of nurses since 1976 found that those living within 50 meters of major roadways­—defined as

VMT Inflection Point: Factors Affecting 21st Century Travel (SSTI, 2013)

For many decades, transportation planning has assumed continued increases in automobile use. Now, in a major reversal, the average American is driving considerably less. According to the most recent FHWA travel-volume report for July, total vehicle miles traveled showed no increase compared to

Public health researchers: Bike guide leaves out facilities favored by many

By Robbie Webber A recent article by Harvard researchers published in the American Journal of Public Health concentrates on the lack of updated bicycle facilities standards in the official AASHTO guides. U.S. DOT Secretary Ray LaHood voiced this same concern when he spoke to the AASHTO national

Study highlights importance of travel time as a metric

By Eric Sundquist As commute times increase, married women work fewer hours or even drop out of the workforce according to a forthcoming article in the Journal of Urban Economics. The finding, summarized for a general audience recently in Atlantic Cities, helps explain differences in women’s