walking

County wants to make informal paths safer, more formal

By Robbie Webber Montgomery County, MD, is asking residents to mark the informal paths that they have been using to reach destinations. Many paths are worn through woods, cul-de-sac ends, and beaten into the grass where good pedestrian connections don’t exist. The county is updating its

Recent trends in school travel mode choice

By Rayla Bellis A recent study analyzed trends in travel to school in the U.S. using 2017 National Household Travel Survey Data and explored factors that impact mode choice. Among the findings, the study shows that the share of students walking and biking to school has increased since 2009 and

Windshield bias among transportation professionals shifts safety burden onto pedestrians

By Chris McCahill Transportation professionals who spend more time behind the wheel tend to believe distracted walking plays an overstated role in pedestrian deaths, according to a new Rutgers study. This belief can steer professionals toward trying to correct pedestrian behavior, rather than

Cities open streets to create more space for walking, biking during pandemic

By Robbie Webber Cities across the country are restricting motor vehicle use on some streets and reallocating road space to give residents more space to move by foot and bicycle while still maintaining appropriate distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic. From New York to Burlington, VT, cities

Researchers say investment in infrastructure has the potential to move short trips out of cars

By Robbie Webber Can the rise of new personal mobility options lure drivers out of their cars for short trips? Several recent reports say, “yes,” but only if cities resolve both infrastructure and legal issues surrounding their use. At the same time, examination of walking and biking rates

Study finds rich and poor most likely to walk

By Chet Edelman As a percentage of all commutes, walking accounts for less than three percent of all trips in the United States. But not all groups in the country walk at the same rate. A new study from the University of Virginia reveals that a distinct socioeconomic divide exists. More

NACTO releases Blueprint for Autonomous Urbanism

By Robbie Webber The National Association of City Transportation Officials has released a guide for cities to prepare for a future with autonomous vehicles. Unlike their previous design guides for bikeways, transit, storm water, and overall streets, this blueprint does not present specific design

Where people walk: Two new studies improve “walkability” measurement

By Chris McCahill In planning and designing for pedestrians, sidewalks are often a good start but rarely make a place walkable on their own. Measuring pedestrian accessibility (the topic of a recent SSTI webinar) depends on two important pieces of information: 1) where destinations are located,

U.S. gets “F” for design and policy to support walking while pedestrian fatalities rise

By Robbie Webber A national coalition of prominent health organizations issued a failing grade to the country as a whole and the vast majority of states when they looked at whether community designs and policies support walking. At the same time, recently-released traffic safety data show a

Safety in numbers and safety by design: A ‘virtuous cycle’

By Chris McCahill Two recent studies reiterate what makes safer walking environments: more pedestrians, according to one; and well-connected networks of local streets, according to the other. Taken together, these studies build upon growing evidence that the safety benefits of cities designed for