TX

Cities testing out autonomous buses, but is it worth the risk?

By Sam Sklar Six weeks ago, Arlington, TX, approved a 6-month lease (with an option to renew for another 6 months) of two EZ10 driverless shuttles to fill a gap for more precise transportation needs for residents of and visitors to the city. According to the city’s staff report, the EZ10 is a

Texas DOT considers major highway removal in new plan for Dallas

By Chris McCahill Earlier this month, the Texas DOT released CityMAP, a document outlining how the agency might handle Dallas’ aging highways over the next 24 years. Most notably, it could lead to the removal of two major freeways from the downtown entirely. In one scenario, Interstate 30,

Transformative transit: Houston’s reconfigured transit system

By Mary Ebeling The City of Houston Metro Transit Agency, after years of declining transit ridership associated with dispersal of jobs and other destinations away from the city’s core service area, embarked on an ambitious multi-year effort to redesign its system to better serve the

With trend towards road tolling, demand forecasting critical

By Mary Ebeling The first leg of Maryland’s Intercounty Connector—known locally as the ICC and envisioned as a multimodal transportation corridor—winds 18.8 miles between I-270/I-370 in Montgomery County and U.S. 1 in Prince George’s County. Supporters sold the project as one that

Tennessee DOT Commissioner halts I-69 project

By Chris Spahr In December, Tennessee Department of Transportation Commissioner John Schroer announced that TDOT would stop work on the segment of Interstate 69 in western Tennessee. Citing the high cost of the next segment of the so-called “NAFTA Highway,” Schroer pointed out the need to

The challenge of communicating bicycle comfort level on maps

By Robbie Webber Although some bicyclists are willing to ride on any road and under any conditions to get to their destination, the vast majority do not feel comfortable mixing with higher speed traffic and watching out for turning cars. A 2012 Mineta Transportation Institute study examined the

Private firms eyeing passenger rail in Florida, Texas, Nevada, and California

By Eric Sunquist While most attention has been focused on public efforts to improve U.S. passenger rail, private firms are also developing at least three intercity rail projects. Probably the most advanced of these is in Florida, where All Aboard Florida (AAF) plans Miami-Orlando service starting

Will drivers pay the price to use fastest road in the Americas?

By Bill Holloway A new stretch of toll road through central Texas linking Austin to San Antonio, State Highway 130, may soon have the highest posted speed limit in the hemisphere. Once completed, sections five and six of the project, totaling 41 miles, may be the first to allow drivers to travel

More Americans commuting long distances to work

Between 2002 and 2009 the number of “super-commuters,” people who work in a metropolitan area’s central county while living outside the bounds of the metropolitan area, grew dramatically, far outpacing workforce growth rates, in all but two of the nation’s ten largest metropolitan labor

And in the same year that Eisenhower introduced the National Highway System

Time Magazine in 1955 gushed about toll roads: “EVERYBODY agrees that the U.S. needs more and better roads, but almost nobody agrees on how to pay for them. While the argument rages, Texas has gone ahead and devised something new: the nation’s first privately owned and privately financed