transit

Not just speed and land use: considering directness of travel

By Eric Sundquist Improving access to destinations means raising travel speed or reducing travel distance. Because of siloing within government, transportation agencies have traditionally worried about speed while leaving distances to land use authorities (though that is beginning to change with

Capturing value for transit improvements

By Mary Ebeling A new transportation enhancement fund assessment on real estate developers in Cambridge, Massachusetts’ Kendall Square will help fund transit improvements in that area, including possible enhancements to the Red Line Kendall/MIT station. Some at the MBTA are looking at

Transit agencies and advocates focus attention on last-mile solutions

By Chris McCahill With transit systems gaining riders, and new systems being launched throughout the U.S., many service providers now face the challenge of ensuring sufficient access to transit stations. In Minneapolis-St. Paul, Metro Transit partnered with a local car-sharing company to provide

Transformative transit: Houston’s reconfigured transit system

By Mary Ebeling The City of Houston Metro Transit Agency, after years of declining transit ridership associated with dispersal of jobs and other destinations away from the city’s core service area, embarked on an ambitious multi-year effort to redesign its system to better serve the

Transit: If you build it wrong, they might not come

By Robbie Webber Both the San Diego Mid-City BRT line and the DC-area Silver Line Metro are struggling with lower than expected ridership. Recent news coverage points out that both lines may suffer from poor implementation. The disappointing usage may hold lessons for other cities considering

Young adults want walkable, transit-accessible neighborhoods, say Realtors

By Chris McCahill The National Association of Realtors, in collaboration with researchers from Portland State University, just released the results of their 2015 Community Preference Survey. The survey reinforces other reports that younger generations are driving less and prefer communities with

New study links low-cost and free recreation facilities near work sites with active commuting

By Bill Holloway A recently released study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has added further detail to our understanding of the link between commuting mode choice and workplace and environmental variables. The study relied on phone interviews with 1,338 commuters living in

Busway sparks new interest in transit in Connecticut

By Chris McCahill Connecticut’s new bus rapid transit system, CTfastrak, has been operating for two months and is already exceeding its projected ridership numbers. Despite being highly controversial, largely because of escalating costs, the system appears to be attracting new riders and

Innovative infrastructure and bikes on trains encourage commuting

By Robbie Webber Cities and states are trying to make biking easier, safer, and more predictable. Across the country, improved connections with transit or installing cutting-edge, on-street bicycle facilities are encouraging more people to embark on non-auto commutes. Three examples illustrate

Research shows the indirect economic benefit of public transportation

By Robbie Webber A study done by Cambridge Systematics for NCHRP Project 20-65 examined the indirect economic benefits to society of state investment in public transportation. The study found there are substantial cost savings to other government programs due to increased access to jobs, health