transit

Where we are today: Five-year trend from 2005 to 2010 shows less commuting by car

New Census data for 2010 show a gradual trend toward less commuting by car and truck, and more by transit, walking and biking. In the nation as a whole, driving to work edged down to 90.2 percent from 90.9 percent five years earlier. Transit rose to 4.9 percent from 4.7 percent, while ped-bike

And in Washington State: Anti-toll initiative heads to the ballot box

A citizen-sponsored initiative to restrict use of highway tolls, targeting both road and related transit projects, will be on the November ballot in Washington State. The measure would restrict toll revenues to the facility on which they are collected; end tolling “after the cost of the project

Is declining car use a long-term trend or just a short-term reaction to the recession?

In ‘Peak Car Use’: Understanding the Demise of Automobile Dependence, published last month in World Transport Policy and Practice, Peter Newman and Jeff Kenworthy, of the Curtin University Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute in Australia, summarize recent data suggesting a long-term shift

Pricing, our only feasible path to reduced congestion?

A recent article by Benjamin Orr in The New Republic, previewing a forthcoming article by researchers, Gilles Duranton and Mathew Turner, at the University of Toronto that looks at data to test the claim that it is impossible to build our way out of traffic congestion. Duranton and Turner found

Achieving a state of good repair

Dr. Michael Meyer from Georgia Tech University (and an expert panel member for several SSTI reports) made a presentation (available here) to USDOT officials about the importance of performance management in improving U.S. highway and transit systems. The webinar was part of RITA’s

Big fixes for our big transportation problems

In a recent Wall Street Journal article, Robert Puentes suggests several big changes that could boost the economy and improve transportation decision-making: Encourage collaboration between the federal government, states, metro areas, and shippers and develop a comprehensive plan to improve the

A less mobile future for America’s baby boomers

A new report by Transportation for America, Aging in Place, Stuck without Options: Fixing the Mobility Crisis Threatening the Baby Boom Generation, investigates the growing problem of senior citizens who, having lived in car-dependent communities and “aged in place,” face isolation, economic

A bus by any other name

Since its introduction in 1974 in Brazil, bus rapid transit (BRT) has made big inroads in mass transit internationally. Cities find BRT systems attractive for the reasons noted by ITDP in Recapturing Global Leadership in Bus Rapid Transit: A Survey of Select U.S. Cities: “Speed of

Have TOD promoters been putting the cart before the horse?

Building on its previous publication, Transit and Employment (2008), the Center for Transit-Oriented Development recently released a new report, Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) and Employment. The report challenges the assumption that employment dispersal outside of central business districts

More roads, more traffic, really dreary news.

Many analyses of road network expansion and congestion have challenged the notion that increasing highway capacity relieves traffic. A recent study of American cities emphasizes that you can’t build your way out of congestion. The analysis by Professors Gilles Duranton and Matthew Turner of the