transit

The bus stigma: Why it exists, and should we care?

By Robbie Webber An article by Amanda Hess in Atlantic Cities asks why riding the bus is stigmatized in the United States. She delves into the history of U.S. transit and transportation policy and funding, which that has contributed to the view of buses as the least desirable way to travel and

SEPTA’s new program generates electricity and excitement

By Robbie Webber As of the end of June, the Southeast Pennsylvania Transit Authority (SEPTA) east-west subway line has started feeding electricity back into the power grid as well as using it to run its trains. With the installation of a battery bank next to the tracks, the energy generated by

Train on wheels – the growing popularity of BRT in Los Angeles

By Mary Ebeling The east-west Orange line is just seven years old, but skyrocketing ridership on the original North Hollywood to Warner Center section, and proven ability to relieve freeway congestion, has already lead to a four-mile extension to Chatsworth.  The success signals to transit

Hub and Spoke: Core Transit Congestion and the Future of Transit and Development in Greater Boston (Urban Land Institute, 2012)

The hub and spoke system of the MBTA has produced record ridership, transit-oriented development patterns, and severe challenges for the system. The report focuses on the need to invest in public transit infrastructure so that the MBTA can serve its growing transit ridership, including future

Getting Around When You’re Just Getting By: The Travel Behavior and Transportation Expenditures of Low-Income Adults (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2011)

This report examines how rising transportation costs affect low-income families. The research used in-depth interviews with 73 adults to determine travel behavior and transportation spending patterns; the costs and benefits of alternative modes of travel; cost management strategies; and opinions

Strategies for using value capture to fund transit

By Mary Ebeling Seventy-five percent of transit funding comes from state and local sources, pointing to a clear need to develop diverse revenue sources to support transit service. As vehicle miles traveled (VMT) continue to decline while transit use increases, the need for new revenues grows in

Reaction to iPhone announcement points to popularity of transit apps

By Eric Sundquist Any time Apple announces new plans for its iPhone, the techie world pays attention. This month, when Apple rolled out version 6 of its iPhone operating system, the news also prompted concern from the transportation community. The worry stems from the map application that will

Walk this Way: The Economic Promise of Walkable Places in Metropolitan Washington, D.C. (Brookings, 2012)

An economic analysis of a sample of neighborhoods in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area using walkability measures, this study offer useful insights for a diverse set of interests, including lenders, developers, economic planning professionals, as well as those interested in the economic

New Chicago plan aims for zero traffic deaths in ten years

By Robbie Webber The city of Chicago is going for zero in 2022. In an ambitious transportation plan released last month, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and DOT Commissioner Gabe Klein lay out their vision of no traffic fatalities within ten years, down from the current average of 50. It’s a bold goal,

Investing in transit improves quality of life in rural areas

By Mary Ebeling Not all transit riders live in urban areas; in fact, 40 percent of transit riders live in areas defined by the census as rural. Addressing rural transit needs has emerged as a major challenge for transit agencies, municipalities, and human services agencies as greater numbers of