transit

Can we bring back the golden era of transit in the U.S.?

By Saumya Jain “One hundred years ago, the United States had a public transportation system that was the envy of the world.” – Jonathan English, Citylab. A recent statistics brief by Union Internationale des Transports Publics compares transit ridership and metro infrastructure development

Speeding up buses with automated enforcement

By Michael Brenneis Transit-exclusive lanes can speed buses or other transit vehicles and make the services more appealing and predictable. But those nearly-empty lanes can seem appealing to the drivers of private vehicles stuck in traffic or looking for short-term parking or loading, so keeping

People won’t use low quality transit

By Rayla Bellis Certain cities in the U.S. are stereotypically considered “transit cities”—generally those in the Northeast, the West Coast, and Chicago. However, recent analysis from Transit Center indicates that many more urban Americans live within walking distance of transit than this

Could transit service cuts be responsible for declining ridership?

By Rayla Bellis It is no secret that transit ridership has declined in recent years in many cities in the U.S. after years of increases. Ridership dropped by 2.5 percent nationwide from 2016 to 2017. While some have speculated that this decline is due to decreasing gas prices or competition from

Federal bill continues support for transportation programs

By Alex Beckmann The new federal “omnibus” appropriation bill, enacted March 23, provides over $86 billion for the U.S. Department of Transportation, a record funding amount and an increase of almost $10 billion from U.S. DOT’s FY ‘17 funding levels. Road, transit, and rail programs all

Livable arterials, not necessarily an oxymoron

By Eric Sundquist Perhaps nowhere is the conflict between mobility and livability more apparent than along arterials. One problem in improving livability is that, while practitioners have multiple well-established standards for mobility, they have none for livability. Since “what gets measured,

Wisconsin’s millennial-recruiting pitch falls flat

By Eric Sundquist Here at SSTI Central in Wisconsin, we enjoy a good-natured joke at our southern neighbors’ expense. But now it’s the Flatlanders’ turn to laugh, at a new Cheesehead State ad campaign, which turns out to be about as hapless as Jay Cutler’s QB career. The campaign features

Chicago to use TNC fees to improve ‘L’ service

By Brian Lutenegger Chicago was the first U.S. jurisdiction to collect a per-ride charge from ride-hailing passengers. Now, Chicago and its transit authority are earmarking a recent increase in that fee to transit improvements and have just announced the specific locations of the projects. Other

Increases in vehicle ownership enlighten southern California’s decrease in public transit ridership

By Logan Dredske Although national transit ridership has remained steady over the last decade, ridership in Southern California has been on the decline (Figure 1). The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) released a report offering explanations for why transit ridership has been

Lessons from the mixed success of microtransit

By Eric Sundquist Partly responding to the current downturn in transit ridership—some driven by transportation network companies’ competition—transit systems have begun to experiment with TNC-like services. Generically called “microtransit,” such systems have a lot in common with