TDM

Nudge science being used to encourage transit use

By Robbie Webber In England, the Nudge Unit—officially called the Behavioural Insights Team—encourages positive social behaviors via behavioral economics and psychology. Now cities in North America are using the lessons of the Nudge Unit to encourage people to use transit and reduce vehicle

Is working from home really reducing VMT?

By Saumya Jain Several companies worldwide are now trying various strategies for reducing energy consumption, environmental impacts, overhead costs, etc. One such up and coming strategy involves transportation demand management solutions like teleworking and flexible schedules. With advancement

Modernizing Mitigation: A Demand-Centered Approach (SSTI, September 2018)

Cities exist to provide people and firms with access to goods, services, employment, and other people. A mark of a city’s success is the clustering of complementary land uses to residents’ and businesses’ mutual benefit; the more people and activities within reach of each other, the greater

The psychology of daily versus monthly parking fees

By Brian Lutenegger The Seattle Times recently reported on the experiences of several major employers trying innovative ways to charge for commuter parking. These employers found that how parking for commuters is priced—on a daily vs. a monthly basis—makes a big difference in their

Downtown Seattle’s drive-alone commute share drops to 30 percent

By Robbie Webber Despite an influx of jobs in Seattle’s downtown area, the number of people driving to work has barely changed since 2010. According to a survey from Commute Seattle, a non-profit working with downtown employers, the working population in and around downtown increased by

San Francisco updates planning code with TDM measures

By Mary Ebeling On February 7, 2017, San Francisco approved an amendment to its existing Planning Code Section 169 that incorporates an ambitious transportation demand management program for future residential and commercial development. Working to manage its transportation system across modes in

GPS data informs transportation projects in Northern Virginia: SSTI study

By Chris McCahill Transportation agencies, dependent for decades on traffic counts and travel demand models, are turning to new sources of data to understand the movement of vehicles and people. These include aerial photography, Bluetooth sensors, and cellular location data. Adding to that list,

Trip-making data, TDM, and connectivity in Northern Virginia (SSTI and Michael Baker International, 2016)

Commercially available GPS data offers valuable new insight about trip origins, destinations, and routes, including short trips that travel demand models often cannot capture. Using this data, SSTI worked with Michael Baker International, the Virginia DOT, and local stakeholders to identify

TDM study suggests we are overestimating vehicle trip generation rates

By Robbie Webber In a recent study done in Melbourne, Australia, researchers compared transportation demand management plans (called “travel plans” in Australia) at four new residential developments with control sites with similar characteristics. The study targeted new developments because

U.S. 36: Changing commute habits through infrastructure, incentives, and education

By Mary Ebeling The Colorado Department of Transportation is putting the final touches on the reconstruction of U.S. 36 between Denver and Boulder, and their efforts to both accommodate and encourage alternatives to driving alone in the corridor seem to be working. Completed by CDOT, the Regional