Safe Routes to School

School site selection: considering transportation impacts on students

By Brian Lutenegger Safe Routes to School programs help make it easier and safer for students to walk or bike to school. The problem is that schools are often sited on previously undeveloped, inexpensive land at the edge of the community, far from where students live. This means it may be

Study finds risky driving still a problem around schools

By Saumya Jain Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among school children. Although some cities and schools that have implemented safety programs around schools have seen decreases in dangerous driving in school zones, those improvements have been more than offset by worsening driver

New research confirms the benefits of the Safe Routes to School program

By Bill Holloway Recently published research in the Journal of the American Planning Association provides strong support for the Safe Routes to School program’s ability to increase rates of walking and biking among students. The authors analyzed changes in the number of students walking and

Do Safe Routes to School programs decrease injuries in school-aged pedestrians?

By Chris Spahr A study published January 13 in PEDIATRICS, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, provided important evidence to support the effectiveness of Safe Routes to School programs. The research, conducted by Charles DiMaggio, PhD, MPH, and Guohua Li, MD, DrPH, of

SSTI seeks input on bike-ped performance measures

By Robbie Webber At the our May meeting, Making the Most of the Transportation Alternatives Program, and again during our July Community of Practice meeting we discussed performance measures for bicycle and pedestrian facilities. We have made some initial inquiries, and it turns out that as

How MPOs Are Handling TAP and SRTS (National Center for Safe Routes to School, 2013)

Large Metropolitan Planning Organizations are taking on a new role in supporting bicycling, walking, and Safe Routes to School as they begin to administer a portion of the new federal Transportation Alternatives program. This white paper from the National Center for Safe Routes to School is

Methods for Estimating the Environmental Health Impacts of SRTS Programs (National Center for Safe Routes to School, 2012)

This report explores environmental health and Safe Routes to School through a review of the relationship between environmental health and school travel, a discussion on measuring the environmental health impacts of school travel, and five examples of methods used by SRTS programs to estimate the

Budget woes force student transportation cuts

By Bill Holloway As the 2012-2013 school year begins, school districts across the country are looking to their student transportation programs for savings. Because districts want to preserve funding for classroom instruction, student transportation is often the first budget item to be cut when

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Traffic (National Center for Safe Routes to School, 2011)

The first installment in the “Getting Results” series on getting and measuring results with SRTS programs. To read more about measuring and evaluating the results of an SRTS program, see the publications: Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Speeding and Distracted

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Speeding and Distracted Driving (National Center for Safe Routes to School, 2012)

The second installment in the “Getting Results” series on getting and measuring results with SRTS programs. To read more about measuring and evaluating the results of an SRTS program, see the publications: Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Traffic and Getting Results: SRTS