roadway design

TDOT puts Complete Streets policy into practice

By Rayla Bellis The Tennessee Department of Transportation adopted a “multimodal access” policy in 2015, but recognized that the policy alone would have limited impact without a more comprehensive approach to improving safety for everyone. Since then, TDOT has taken steps to update

Maryland designs for calmer traffic on urban highway

By Michael Brenneis Arterials bounded by urban or suburban development cease to function exclusively as throughways, and are good candidates for reconfiguration to support the land uses that surround them. As more bicyclists and pedestrians use a corridor, conflict with motor vehicles and

New NACTO and USDOT Volpe Center reports call for improved vehicle design to increase safety

By Brian Lutenegger A pair of new reports examines how the design of large vehicles—such as fire trucks, garbage and recycling vehicles, and freight trucks—impacts traffic fatalities in cities. These types of vehicles have a disproportionate impact on urban roadway safety for all users.

Toward livable streets: A review of recent improvements in practice

By Eric Sundquist In the last decade a number of project development and design guides, such as ITE’s “Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares,”  NACTO’s “Urban Street Design Guide,” and city design guide manuals, have emerged. A new article by Eric Dumbaugh of Florida Atlantic

Livable arterials, not necessarily an oxymoron

By Eric Sundquist Perhaps nowhere is the conflict between mobility and livability more apparent than along arterials. One problem in improving livability is that, while practitioners have multiple well-established standards for mobility, they have none for livability. Since “what gets measured,

Agencies must embrace new design standards to improve safety, according to federal report

By Chris McCahill The U.S. Government Accountability Office released a report addressing the recent increase in deaths and injuries among pedestrians and bicycle users. The report outlined the causes, responses from transportation agencies, and remaining challenges to address the disparity in

FHWA: We are not a barrier to safer, slower, innovative road design

By Robbie Webber On August 20 the Federal Highway Administration posted a new page on its website. The title, Bicycle and Pedestrian Funding, Design, and Environmental Review: Addressing Common Misconceptions, belies the importance of the clarifications FHWA is trying to make. The page addresses

MassDOT implements policies to increase walk, bike, and transit travel

By Eric Sundquist In support of its goal to triple walking, biking and transit travel by 2030, the Massachusetts DOT has issued a Healthy Transportation Policy Initiative with several implementation steps. Among the actions required by the document: All MassDOT-funded projects must seek to

FHWA to study safety and design of cycle tracks

By Robbie Webber At the March AASHTO meeting, U.S. DOT Secretary Ray LaHood urged the attendees to update their guidance for bicycle facilities such as cycle tracks, also known as protected or separated bike lanes. These facilities are popular with less experienced bicycle commuters and have been

New NACTO guide pushes U.S. innovation in bike facility design

By Mary Ebeling Many U.S. cities are including bicycle and pedestrian facilities in their transportation planning. However, these same cities often find existing design guides do not provide the set of options they need for non-motorized infrastructure, complicating project implementation and