research

Productivity of trains as mobile offices a factor in mode selection

By Robbie Webber Although driving or flying may be faster door-to-door, trains offer something those modes do not: uninterrupted time to work. And this additional work time is starting to be a factor in transportation mode choice for many workers. Although many people attempt to work while

Public Bikesharing in North America: Early Operator and User Understanding (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2012)

This study evaluates public bikesharing in North America, reviewing the advances in technology and major events during its rapid expansion. It looks at several angles, including current operational practices, business models, and environmental and social impacts in North America. Background

Report shows that higher congestion is associated with better economies

By Eric Sunquist While transportation agencies gamely battle to reduce congestion with diminishing resources, a new report suggests that traffic jams may have a good side. They are linked to strong economies. Eric Dumbaugh of Florida Atlantic University, writing in The Atlantic Cities,

AZ DOT report finds compact development reduces VMT without increasing localized congestion

By Eric Sundquist A first-ever analysis of land-use and transportation demand in Arizona contradicts fears that compact, “smart growth” development, while beneficial in moderating demand, will increase localized congestion. The report, produced for Arizona DOT in March, also suggests that

Ecodriving and Carbon Footprinting: Understanding How Public Education Can Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Use (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2012)

Ecodriving is a collection of changes to driving behavior and vehicle maintenance designed to impact fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in existing vehicles. Because of its promise to improve fuel economy within the existing fleet, ecodriving has gained increased attention in

Promoting Bicycle Commuter Safety (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2012)

This report examines the “five Es” for increasing bicycle commuter safety, but focuses on education and engineering. Case studies from California and Portland, OR give first hand information about bicycle safety. Download the full report.

Neither roads nor public transit will help?

In the October 2011 issue of the American Economic Review, authors Gilles Duranton and Matthew A. Turner review traffic data from the years 1983 to 2003. Their article, “The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from US Cities,” finds that, for the time period reviewed, congestion

WSDOT quantifies the GHG reduction impact of sidewalk coverage.

“If you build it, they will come” seems to hold for building sidewalks. A recent report for the Washington State Department of Transportation found that increasing sidewalk coverage from 30 percent to 70 percent of all streets was estimated to reduce VMT by 3.4 percent and GHG emissions by

GAO: Trucking the least efficient mode of freight shipping

Would roads be better used with fewer trucks? D.C. Streets Blog reports: “The Government Accountability Office published a study finding that the costs of freight trucking that are not passed on to the consumer are at least six times greater than the equivalent rail costs and at least nine