research

Research shows the indirect economic benefit of public transportation

By Robbie Webber A study done by Cambridge Systematics for NCHRP Project 20-65 examined the indirect economic benefits to society of state investment in public transportation. The study found there are substantial cost savings to other government programs due to increased access to jobs, health

New critique identifies troubling errors in FHWA’s report on driver distraction from digital signs

By Bill Holloway It is common wisdom that driver distraction, whether due to texting, talking on the phone, or other causes, increases the risk of crashes. A 2006 Virginia Tech study found that 80 percent of crashes involved driver inattention in the three seconds preceding the event. The federal

Real-time transit data in demand

By Robbie Webber A recent study has shown that real-time arrival data for buses does indeed boost transit usage. And several cities have discovered that they don’t have to do all the work of getting the information into riders’ hands. Although regular transit riders love the convenience of

New survey results highlight key obstacles to bike ridership

By Bill Holloway A new survey commissioned by People for Bikes finds that, along with concerns about infrastructure and cars, equity-related issues loom large among the obstacles to higher bike ridership. Among the more than 16,000 people surveyed, 48 percent lived in a household without an

Researchers apply travel time reliability measures in modeling and project evaluation

By Chris McCahill Transportation planners and traffic analysts who typically measure road performance in terms of delay are beginning to incorporate measures of travel time reliability, which describe the hourly and daily variation in travel times due to congestion and transit delay. These

Head’s Up! New tools to improve warning signs

By Mary Ebeling Roadway signs play an important role in our travel environment, influencing safety for auto, bicycle, and pedestrian modes. Yet in our daily travels these signs tend to fade into the background environment rather than heightening our awareness. A new study, published in the

New research highlights the benefits of two-way communication for transit agencies

By Bill Holloway Transit agencies use social media such as Twitter and Facebook to communicate with stakeholders, but they may be missing out on some of the biggest potential advantages of these platforms by using them primarily for one-way communications—service announcements, press releases,

Researchers explore links between speed and safety

By Chris McCahill As states experiment with increasing and lowering speed limits on rural highways, questions still remain as to what effects those changes might have on safety. At this year’s annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board, researchers trying to answer some of those

Accessibility moves out of the lab and into practice

By Eric Sundquist Accessibility, long considered a more robust measure of transportation system success than simple mobility, is moving out of research and into practice, according to panelists on an SSTI webinar. Accessibility measures the ease by which travelers can reach desired destinations,

Walkable communities could improve cognitive ability among older adults

By Chris Spahr Numerous studies have supported the linkages between transportation planning and public health.  A new study out of the University of Kansas specifically addresses the cognitive benefits of walkable neighborhoods to older adults. Amber Watts, an Assistant Professor of Clinical