research

New research on the benefits of ignition interlock devices

By Mary Ebeling New research from the University of Pennsylvania finds that states that have passed laws requiring ignition-interlock devices (IIDs) for all drivers convicted of drunk driving have seen a collective 15 percent drop in deaths from drunk-driving crashes compared with rates in states

Bikesharing and Bicycle Safety (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2016)

When bike sharing first began, many commentators and critics expressed concern that shared bicycle systems would lead to high crash and injury rates. Bikesharing has some qualities that appear inherently unsafe for bicyclists. Most prominently, helmet usage is documented to be quite low in most

Montreal study finds vulnerable populations have more exposure to road noise

By Robbie Webber The World Health Organization considers road noise a health hazard, and various studies have found that road noise can have a detrimental effect on health and wellbeing, including influencing heart disease, diabetes, sleep loss, and high blood pressure. These effects are

New report draws attention to need to focus on multimodal transportation

By Mary Ebeling NCHRP Project 20-24 89(B) , “The Role and Value of Transportation in America’s Economy,” highlights the need to develop a collective appreciation for the modern demands on the nation’s multimodal transportation system. The research team considers four thematic case studies

Research points to factors affecting crash rates among states

By Chris McCahill The transportation industry is constantly working to improve safety on America’s roads—often through in-vehicle improvements, infrastructure design, new technologies, education, and enforcement. But without looking at safety trends and factors more broadly, we risk missing

Research shows advantages, use patterns for different car-sharing models

By Mary Ebeling Car sharing is maturing, expanding options beyond the initial model of a station-based system structured around accessing and returning cars parked at designated location. Of particular interest is the free-floating car share model, or FFCS, which allows members to pick up and

Study confirms that 10-foot lanes make safer intersections

By Chris McCahill Side impact- and turn-related crash rates are lowest at intersections where average lane widths are between 10 and 10.5 feet, according to a study presented at the Canadian Institute of Transportation’s annual meeting last month. This challenges the long-held, but often

Compact, connected development patterns on the rise since mid-1990s

By Chris McCahill Low density, disconnected development patterns—or sprawl—peaked in the mid-1990s, then declined by as much as 9 percent in the following decades, according to a new analysis of street patterns published by the National Academy of Sciences. Because of its innovative

It’s not all about the mode: Race and gender bias in yielding to non-motorized road users

By Mary Ebeling Two recent studies suggest that bias in driver behavior toward other road users could be contributing to enhanced stress levels for certain groups of pedestrians and bicyclists. Recent research documents a difference in drivers yielding to pedestrians based on race in Portland,

New study links low-cost and free recreation facilities near work sites with active commuting

By Bill Holloway A recently released study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has added further detail to our understanding of the link between commuting mode choice and workplace and environmental variables. The study relied on phone interviews with 1,338 commuters living in