pedestrians

“War on cars” (or bicycles) isn’t new

By Robbie Webber A recent NPR story asked if there was really a “war on cars.” This idea seems to appear in newspaper comments, on radio talk shows, and as opinion pieces whenever funding is moved from highway capacity expansion to transit, parking fees are raised, or street right of way is

Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

By Bill Holloway A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Basing pre-construction traffic projections on the average share of drivers at suburban big-box stores in the

Land Use and Transportation Scenario Analysis and Microsimulation (LUTSAM) Tool (SSTI and DelDOT, 2012)

SSTI provided technical assistance to the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) to establish a transferable process to perform Smart Transportation/Smart Growth analyses. The project created a 3-D building library in regionally appropriate styles as well as the LUTSAM (Land Use and

Community Design and the Incidence of Crashes Involving Pedestrians and Motorists Aged 75 and Older (Texas Transportation Institute, 2012)

Contemporary community design practice has focused on strategies intended to make communities safe for families with children. Comparatively little attention has been given to its effects on older adults. This study examines how urban form may affect the incidence of  killed-or-severely-injured

New crosswalk technology improves pedestrian safety

Congress’s ongoing debate over whether to include funding for pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure in the next transportation bill does not change the fact that pedestrian traffic deaths are unacceptably high. Sixty-seven percent of the more than 47,000 pedestrian fatalities from 2000 to 2009

Dangerous By Design (Transportation For America, 2011)

Although nearly 12 percent of traffic deaths are pedestrians, little public attention – and even less in public resources – has been committed to reducing pedestrian deaths and injuries in the United States. This report outlines what states and the federal government can and should do to

Why “forgiving roadways” are not the solution in urban areas

Roadway designers since the 1960’s have used the concept of “forgiving highways.” This design philosophy attempts to “forgive” driver error on interstates and freeways by providing wide, obstacle-free clear zones, burying the end of roadside guardrails and flattening or rounding slopes

Bicycling and Walking in the U.S.: 2012 Benchmarking Report (Alliance for Biking and Walking, 2012)

This 3rd biennial benchmarking report looks at data and policies in all 50 states and the 51 largest US cities to examine how they stack up for walking and biking. This is a useful tool for local and state officials that would like to improve conditions and safety for bicyclists and pedestrians,

A small city tries to fund sidewalk improvements

Missoula, Montana—a city of roughly 70,000 people— for decades had a policy similar to many cities of allowing property owners to decide if they wanted a sidewalk, and pay for it themselves. This created city streets that resembled “broken teeth,” where properties with sidewalks were next

Pedestrians losing last refuge in the public right of way to bicycles

The entire public street – building face to building face – used to be the realm of pedestrians. As transportation modes changed, the pedestrian got pushed farther and farther towards the edges, first by streetcars, and then by cars. Now the pedestrian may be losing the last refuge, the