pedestrians

To improve walking, give pedestrians the green light

By Chris McCahill Walking in many parts of the U.S. is notoriously difficult and increasingly dangerous, but there’s one simple way that transportation agencies can start tipping the balance in favor of those on foot: by adjusting signal controls. That’s according to research highlighted by

Federally funded data as a speed-management tool

By Eric Sunquist and Michael Brenneis At 8 p.m. on April 27, about two miles from SSTI Central in Madison, a car sped north at 102 mph along an urban boulevard, according to police. The driver lost control and careened onto the sidewalk, hitting two people out for a walk. The crash killed one

Hit-and-run crashes are on the rise

By Michael Brenneis Hit-and–run fatal crashes are increasing in the United States. Why? The short answer is that we don’t entirely know. Studies are limited, and data regarding the characteristics of drivers and victims is not extensive. Many hit-and-run drivers get away. Witnesses may not be

Florida’s pedestrian record could have been much worse

By Robbie Webber Until recently, Florida had the dubious distinction of being rated the most dangerous state for pedestrians, but it now has competition from Arizona. However, a new study shows that things could have been even worse in Florida. Researchers writing in the American Journal of

Livable arterials, not necessarily an oxymoron

By Eric Sundquist Perhaps nowhere is the conflict between mobility and livability more apparent than along arterials. One problem in improving livability is that, while practitioners have multiple well-established standards for mobility, they have none for livability. Since “what gets measured,

Pedestrian deaths are a systemic problem in the U.S.

Bu Chris McCahill Pedestrian deaths hovered around 6,000 in 2017, according to a new report from the Governor’s Highway Safety Association. That’s a slight drop from the previous year but still 45 percent higher than in 2009. Media reports have hyped a handful of theories to explain the

Research finds R1-6 gateway treatment can rival RFFB and PHB lights at pedestrian crossings

By Robbie Webber Research in Michigan has shown that in-street, yield-to-pedestrian signs can affect both yielding behavior and driver speeds approaching crosswalks to the same degree as installation of a Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon (RFFB) or Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon (PHB.) This is good

Accessible Shared Streets: Notable Practices and Considerations for Accommodating Pedestrians with Vision Disabilities (FHWA, FHWA, October 2017)

Shared streets, which serve both slow-moving motor vehicles and pedestrians, can provide flexible, desirable public spaces. However, they provide a challenge for pedestrians with vision impairments. FHWA’s guide provides a toolbox of design options, as well as planning guidance and case

Pedestrians First: Tools for a Walkable City (ITDP, 2018)

The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy recently released Pedestrians First: Tools for a Walkable City. The toolkit, aimed at governments, city planners, NGOs, and developers, notes that “Walkability is the foundation of any type of transportation; all trips require walking at

FHWA issues new guidance on pedestrian crossings

By Eric Sundquist Despite many DOTs’ attention to complete streets, pedestrian fatalities are spiking nationwide. One problem is that, even with good sidewalks, in many places controlled crossings are widely spaced, and uncontrolled crossings can be quite dangerous. FHWA’s Every Day Counts