mobility

Netflix-of-transportation app guiding users toward sustainable mode choices

By Saumya Jain The Whim app , which some call the “Netflix of transportation,” is now a year old. The app works on the principle of mobility as a service (MaaS) and partners with local public and private transportation providers, bundling transit and taxi fares, bikeshare trips, and other

Lyft tests mobility as a service across major U.S. cities

By Eric Sundquist The move toward “mobility as a service” (MaaS) took a step forward last week when Lyft expanded a pilot program, for people who agree not to drive a private car, to dozens of cities. The “Ditch Your Car Challenge” program, initially offered just in Chicago but now in 35

Does urban sprawl inhibit upward mobility?

By Robbie Webber A study by Reid Ewing, Shima Hamidi, et al. published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning lends more support to the idea that sprawl can be a deterrent to upward mobility, making it difficult for low-income residents to improve their economic circumstances. Compact metro

Free transit passes improve London’s youth and older riders’ mental health and sense of community

By Robbie Webber Two separate studies from London show that providing free transit passes can improve the sense of belonging, decrease isolation, and improve mental health in both youth and older adults. Adults over 60 and those with disabilities can obtain a Freedom Pass, which allows free

Does the travel-time index really reflect performance?

By Eric Sundquist and Bill Holloway Last week’s release of the Texas A&M Urban Mobility Report, with its charts and lists, prompted the usual flurry of general interest media coverage. This year’s report, however, carries more importance than usual, as it comes at a time when FHWA is

Transportation, Mobility, and Older Adults in Rural Michigan (University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute Behavioral Sciences Group, 2012)

Mobility, or the ability to get from place to place, is important for everyone. Mobility enables people to conduct the activities of daily life, stay socially connected with their world, participate in activities that make life enjoyable, and maintain their quality of life. In the United States

Aging in Place, Stuck Without Options (Transportation for America, 2011)

By 2015, more than 15.5 million Americans 65 and older will live in communities where public transportation service is poor or non-existent. That number is expected to continue to grow rapidly as the baby boom generation “ages in place” in suburbs and exurbs with few mobility options for

Public transportation’s hidden gender bias

Are we under reporting trips made by women? And do we need to redesign transit facilities to better accommodate women? Researchers at Stanford University think so and have coined the term “mobility of care.” Trips made by care givers and involving domestic errands, categories more heavily

And where we might be tomorrow: Bill Ford says “The mobility model we have today, will not work tomorrow.”

Bill Ford of Ford Motor Company spoke on the future of transportation where the world’s current 800 million cars may have increased to 2-4 billion cars by 2050. His concluding thoughts about the infrastructure of tomorrow point to a high-tech optimization of mobility. For another speculation