legal

Yes, communities can be sued for their unsafe streets

By Robbie Webber Cities can be sued if they don’t provide a safe environment for pedestrians or bicyclists. Two cases in recent years—including one before the New York Court of Appeals (New York’s highest court)—prove that. But winning a lawsuit against a city is quite uncommon, and the

Patent lawsuit puts the brakes on a pedestrian safety option

By Robbie Webber A recent memo from FHWA has complicated the pedestrian safety campaigns of jurisdictions across the country. According to the memo, FHWA is rescinding interim approval for use of Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons, known as RRFBs. The cause of the rescission is a patent lawsuit

Wisconsin budget amendment threatens future of bike and pedestrian facilities

By Robbie Webber The recently passed Wisconsin state budget contains an amendment that removes the ability of local communities and the state DOT to use eminent domain for bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. This provision, added anonymously at the last minute and passed by the legislature

We all break traffic laws. Why are bicyclists different?

By Robbie Webber Bicyclists break traffic laws, but they do so at a lower rate than either drivers or pedestrians. It would be safe to say that almost 100 percent of roadway users break traffic laws. Yet the general public’s perception of lawbreaking behavior by drivers and bicyclists is vastly

Race and class disparities in driver’s license suspension and consequences in California

By Bill Holloway Driver’s license suspension, at least in California, is highly correlated with race and income. Ninety two percent of zip codes with higher than average license suspension rates due to failure to pay (FTP) or failure to appear (FTA) for previous infractions have below average

Vermont taking steps to reduce the number of drivers with suspended licenses

By Bill Holloway The Vermont Agency of Transportation is working to reduce the number of state residents with suspended licenses. As reported by Vermont Public Radio, there are about 30,000 Vermonters with suspended licenses at any time in the state with 626,000 people. The majority of these

VA Supreme Court: Tunnel tolls are user fees, not taxes

By Robbie Webber In a ruling denounced by the Portsmouth business community and commuters, but applauded by VDOT, the Virginia Supreme Court unanimously overturned a ruling by a lower court that held the tolls imposed to pay for tunnel expansions and maintenance in Portsmouth are

California first state to regulate ridesharing

By Robbie Webber The popularity and use of ridesharing services and web sites, such as Lyft, Uber, and Sidecar, has risen as the near-ubiquity of smartphones and fast cell service has allowed passengers needing rides to quickly connect with drivers using their private cars to make a little extra

Two lawsuits seek to rein in transit data patent troll

By Robbie Webber After suing dozens of transit agencies and hundreds of private companies, patent troll company ArrivalStar could be hitting the wall. The United States Patent and Trademark Office has drastically narrowed the patent owned by the company after the Electronic Frontier Foundation

Assessing the Extent and Determinates of Induced Growth (Montana DOT, 2013)

Transportation improvements affect the accessibility of places, which in turn can result in changes in land use in combination with factors that support or discourage development (such as land prices, market demand, local land use regulations, and environmental constraints). Transportation