lawsuits

New life for GHG tracking rule?

By Eric Sundquist In the waning days of the Obama administration, FHWA finalized the last set of performance measures for states and MPOs. That seemed to end a 4.5-year rulemaking effort that had kicked off in mid-2012 with the signing of the MAP-21 transportation bill. However, the incoming

Municipalities may be liable for crashes on streets where design encourages high speeds

By Bill Holloway On December 22, the New York State Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, ruled that municipalities may be liable for traffic injuries when the design of roads contributes to reckless driving or excessive speeding. The 6-1 decision in Turturro v. City of New York found

California city loses lawsuit after death of bicyclist on road with substandard bike lanes and no lighting

By Robbie Webber In June 2012, Dr. Gerald Brett Weiss, a nationally known neurosurgeon, was killed when he was hit from behind while riding his bicycle in the community of Indian Wells, CA. In mid-November of this year his family won a $5.8 million judgment against Indian Wells, claiming that the

Two lawsuits seek to rein in transit data patent troll

By Robbie Webber After suing dozens of transit agencies and hundreds of private companies, patent troll company ArrivalStar could be hitting the wall. The United States Patent and Trademark Office has drastically narrowed the patent owned by the company after the Electronic Frontier Foundation

Ohio city may lose federal road funding over refusal to install bus stops

By Robbie Webber The city of Beavercreek, OH, a suburb of Dayton, could lose $10.7 million in federal transportation funding for roads because of its refusal to install bus stops requested by the RTA near a large mall. FHWA gave the city 90 days to take steps to comply with their request that the

Bill would rein in patent trolling of transit systems

By Eric Sundquist A bipartisan bill pending in a U.S. House committee would put “patent trolls” on the hook for defendants’ legal costs, making unfounded patent-infringement suits less attractive. The Saving High-Tech Innovators from Egregious Legal Disputes (SHIELD) Act, or H.R. 845, was

“Patent troll” targets transit agencies over vehicle tracking apps

For years, technology companies have battled “patent trolls,” individuals and firms that do not produce products, but instead sue to assert patent rights to various innovations. A working paper from Boston University Law School, charges that such lawsuits drained $500 billion from tech