job access

Latinos are being pushed to urban edges, rural areas with few transportation options

By Robbie Webber A study by researchers at UT Health San Antonio details the barriers that Latinos in the U.S. face because of poor access to transportation options. Inadequate transit options, unreliable or spotty schedules, long commutes, and a geographic mismatch between jobs and affordable

Access to jobs by transit is on the rise

By Chris McCahill In most large metropolitan areas, the typical worker could reach more jobs by transit in 2016 than in 2015, according to the newest Access Across America report from the University of Minnesota’s Accessibility Observatory. Accessibility increased in 36 out of 49 regions. The

Job type and location may keep low-wage workers from using transit

By Chris McCahill Affordable transit service can be a major asset to low-wage workers, but characteristics of their jobs—such as where and when they work—may keep them from using those services. Workers are more likely to use transit when they work in suburban employment clusters or urban

Trip-making and accessibility: New tools, better decisions (SSTI, 2016)

Transportation researchers and practitioners have long sought other tools to complement or perhaps replace conventional methods—tools that would better analyze trips rather than speed at points in the system, speak to non-auto modes of travel, address land use solutions as well as highway

Research shows the indirect economic benefit of public transportation

By Robbie Webber A study done by Cambridge Systematics for NCHRP Project 20-65 examined the indirect economic benefits to society of state investment in public transportation. The study found there are substantial cost savings to other government programs due to increased access to jobs, health

Ready. Transit. Go: Lining up development to meet current and future transportation demands

By Mary Ebeling Minneapolis-St. Paul has big plans. The Twin Cities have set a goal to develop 14 transit ways by 2030 in an effort to transform the future transportation infrastructure and development patterns there. These transit ways will need to carry a high number of riders to remain

Study highlights importance of travel time as a metric

By Eric Sundquist As commute times increase, married women work fewer hours or even drop out of the workforce according to a forthcoming article in the Journal of Urban Economics. The finding, summarized for a general audience recently in Atlantic Cities, helps explain differences in women’s