infrastructure

New resource offers guidance and tools for right-sizing transportation investments

By Rayla Bellis NCHRP has released a new guidebook to help state DOTs systematically integrate a right-sizing approach into their decision-making. The practice of “right-sizing” involves modifying the size, extent, function, and composition of existing or planned infrastructure and services

Researchers say investment in infrastructure has the potential to move short trips out of cars

By Robbie Webber Can the rise of new personal mobility options lure drivers out of their cars for short trips? Several recent reports say, “yes,” but only if cities resolve both infrastructure and legal issues surrounding their use. At the same time, examination of walking and biking rates

Planning for resilience in Vermont

By Michael Brenneis The Vermont Agency of Transportation, along with a list of partners (p. iv), has developed a planning tool to identify and prioritize parts of the transportation network most at risk of flooding, fluvial erosion, landslides, or other natural disasters. The need for a

The persistence of pedestrianism

By Robbie Webber An investigation of the “persistence of pedestrianism,” written by Peter Norton and published by Cambridge University Press, explores the history of both the rise of the dominance of automobiles as personal transportation and the continuing pushback by pedestrian advocates

ITE Journal: advisory bike lanes are safe and effective

By Eric Sundquist Since 2010, a new design for accommodating active transportation has been slowly growing in popularity in North America. The “advisory bike lane” (ABL) or “advisory shoulder” design, also known as “edge lane roads,” provides bike and/or pedestrian space on each side

Why didn’t the turtles cross the road?

By Rayla Bellis A study from Ohio University evaluating the impacts of a new bypass on Eastern Box Turtles found unexpected results: turtles living next to the bypass did not exhibit heightened stress levels, but not one of them crossed the road over a two year period, including via a

Is there bias in GPS enabled smartphone cycling app data?

By Michael Brenneis Smartphones with GPS tracking ability are capable of collecting large amounts of pedestrian and cyclist movement data. But do tracking apps developed largely for athletic or route-planning use capture the big picture of where pedestrians and cyclists travel and what

Inequities in allocation of bike infrastructure investments

By Saumya Jain The pressing need for safer active transportation infrastructure cannot be overlooked anymore, with 2019 being the deadliest year of the century for pedestrians and cyclists. Although federal spending on active transportation increased from $6 million to $835 million from 1990 to

People weigh risk versus convenience in whether to use pedestrian bridges

By Chris McCahill Pedestrian bridges may help keep people away from heavy traffic, but only if people are willing to use them. And that often isn’t the case, according to a new study in Accident Analysis & Prevention. People will cross at street level to avoid tall or narrow, constrained

Invisible women

By Beth Osborne Research and design are based on a test case human who stands in for the broader population. The default human that is the basis for research and design projects is usually a white adult male. As a result, projects often come to conclusions that do not address the needs of women,