housing

Highway and LRT nodes have similar impacts on home values

By Bill Holloway Both highway exits and light rail transit stations appear to generate similar impacts on single-family home values. Using a spatial hedonic model to analyze single-family home values in Phoenix, Arizona, researchers found that proximity to a transport node (LRT station or highway

The value of walkability

By Bill Holloway Is a home worth an $850 price premium for each additional Walk Score point? That’s the value that Emily Washington and Eli Dourado came up with using a fixed-effects model to analyze home sales across all metro and micropolitan areas in the U.S. Along with that finding,

The Correlates of Housing Price Changes with Geography, Density, Design and Use: Evidence from Philadelphia (Congress for the New Urbanism, 2012)

University of Pennsylvania economist Kevin Gillen analyzes the stability of Philadelphia-area home prices from 2007-2012 as they correlate to walkable, urban neighborhoods versus exurban, auto-centered locales. In a reversal of trends from past recessions, the walkable, urban neighborhoods have

Losing Ground: The Struggle of Moderate-Income Households to Afford the Rising Costs of Housing and Transportation (Center for Housing Policy and the Center on Neighborhood Technology, 2012)

An update of the 2006 report, A Heavy Load: The Combined Housing and Transportation Burdens of Working Families, this report looks at the increasing burden of the combination of housing and transportation on moderate-income households. Six years later, the idea that housing and transportation

Walk/Transit/Bike Score now an important number for real estate

By Robbie Webber Ever since Walk Score debuted in 2007, savvy real estate and rental agents have used the number to sell properties to clients who want to be walking distance from amenities. Now there is evidence that simply being in a walkable neighborhood may increase the value of housing. A

The Shifting Nature of U.S. Housing Demand (The Demand Institute, 2012)

The Demand Institute is jointly operated by The Conference Board and Nielsen. This is their first major publication. They believe the trajectory of the housing market has now reached a true turning point; the worst of the housing crash is over, and a recovery has now started. This housing

Exurban development continues to decline, while cities return to pre-recession growth

By Eric Sundquist  Growth in urban-fringe suburbs, once the fastest-growing parts of metropolitan areas, has stalled, new Census data shows. From 1990 through the mid-2000s, growth in exurban counties was running at about 2 percent per year, according to an analysis by the Brookings Institution.

Super commuters 2.0 — flying to work

Along with the steep rise in normal super commuting — people commuting to a metropolitan area’s central county from homes outside the metro area — the number of people commuting across the country by plane has grown dramatically as well, at least in Manhattan. A recent article in

Long commutes are worse than you thought

Divorce, stress, loneliness, and medical problems are just a few of the negative effects of long commutes. As Annie Lowrey details in a recent Slate article, a growing body of research has found the negative impacts of lengthy commutes to be wide-ranging and potentially severe. Interestingly, it