health

Does active transportation add to overall physical activity, or substitute for other exercise?

By Rayla Bellis New research in the Journal of Transport and Health investigates whether people who spend more time walking and biking daily to work and errands in the U.S. and the Netherlands spend less time exercising overall. The study findings indicate the opposite—the likelihood of

E-bikes mean longer, more frequent bike trips

By Robbie Webber On June 18, the Madison, WI, bikesharing system became the first in the U.S. to switch its entire fleet to electric pedal-assist bikes, although other cities have been adding e-bikes to their fleet for several years. Results from a comparison of e-bike vs. standard bike usage

Proximity to highways affects long-term school performance

By Robbie Webber A study from the National Bureau of Economic Research extends our knowledge of the effects of attending school near major roadways. Previous studies have found short-term effects on test scores, behavior, and school absences on days of poor air quality, but this new research

Neighborhood walkability and residential preferences in midsized cities

By Saumya Jain Many studies have established a significant relationship between walkable neighborhoods and impacts on health and travel behaviors. In the past, most of these studies were based on large metropolitan areas with significant variability in built environment and residential options. A

Shorter commutes make for more reliable workers

By Chris McCahill There’s no shortage of research suggesting that longer commutes can take a toll on workers’ health and happiness. But if that doesn’t concern employers and public officials, a new study out of Australia shows that longer commutes also translate into lower job performance

New study details non-emission particulates

By Michael Brenneis Greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles deserve a lot of attention, but particulates from vehicles are also a significant health concern. Tiny soot particles can be inhaled deeply into the lungs. Larger-sized particles can contaminate nearby fields and groundwater, and deliver

Aging Boomers could cause transportation shakeup

By Chris McCahill Suburban Baby Boomers hoping to age in place are beginning to put new demands on our transportation system, according to a recent New York Times article. Once they can no longer drive, many older folks find themselves needing in-home services or drivers that can offer more

U.S. gets “F” for design and policy to support walking while pedestrian fatalities rise

By Robbie Webber A national coalition of prominent health organizations issued a failing grade to the country as a whole and the vast majority of states when they looked at whether community designs and policies support walking. At the same time, recently-released traffic safety data show a

A toolkit to measure and value “community severance” due to traffic

By Erin Evenhouse A high-traffic road can divide a community in more ways than one. Researchers haven’t always been able to show to what extent such roads can harm a community’s access, health, or quality of life. A new study outlined in the latest volume of the Journal of Transport and

Google’s Street View cars are measuring and mapping air pollution

By Rayla Bellis Last week, Google and the Environmental Defense Fund published the first in a series of maps with data on pollution levels collected using Google Street View vehicles. The initiative, a partnership between EDF, Google Earth Outreach, and San Francisco-based company Aclima, will