funding

How do you get there from here?

Fuel taxes are no longer a good way of funding the transportation system. With increasing fuel efficiency and new fuels powering transportation, the fuel tax as we know it is not sustainable. Two national commissions set up by the U.S. Congress recommended replacing fuel taxes with a

And in the same year that Eisenhower introduced the National Highway System

Time Magazine in 1955 gushed about toll roads: “EVERYBODY agrees that the U.S. needs more and better roads, but almost nobody agrees on how to pay for them. While the argument rages, Texas has gone ahead and devised something new: the nation’s first privately owned and privately financed

Bookends on the highway era: A view at the start and a look back from today

Fortune magazine has republished a September 1958 article that takes stock of the Interstate construction boom, just then beginning. It’s a thorough and surprisingly prescient take, and one that reminds us that our highway system didn’t just happen by some invisible hand of the market or

GM CEO: “We ought to just slap a dollar tax on a gallon of gas.”

“Well, it’s unanimous – everyone agrees the country needs a significant hike in the gas tax. Everyone outside of Congress, that is. Last week, General Motors CEO Dan Akerson told The Detroit News that a higher gas tax would help solidify the market for more fuel-efficient cars.” Read the

Kansas Increases Funding for Railroad Loan/Grant Program

Recognizing the importance of rail service to industries and communities dependent on moving heavy, lower-value-per-ton goods, Kansas recently increased funding for its State Rail Service Improvement Fund (SRSIF) from $3 million to $5 million annually. The program provides low-interest loans and

Voters approve smart transportation referenda

The Nov. 2 election dimmed the chance of a major new infusion of federal money for transportation.  But when voters were presented with local projects and plans, they usually said yes, even when it meant higher taxes. Voters in 13 states approved 22 of 30 measures on the ballot, totaling nearly