freight

Will advances in autonomous technology degrade job quality in the trucking industry?

By Michael Brenneis While advances in autonomous technology may net additional jobs in the trucking sector, without thoughtful public policy and a commitment to equitable private practices, they may end up being some of the worst the industry has to offer, and come at the expense of jobs at the

Federal grant to increase efficiency in Midwest rail network, untangle Chicago bottleneck

By Michael Brenneis Chicago has become a notorious rail bottleneck, responsible for delays that impede freight delivery, Amtrak, Metra passenger service, and even drivers trying to cross rail lines. Now, one of the worst tangles—the 75th Street corridor—is about to get a little better thanks

Many variables in play as deadline for maritime fuel sulfur reduction approaches

By Michael Brenneis Maritime shipping remains the most efficient way to transport goods, considering its weight to fuel-economy ratio. Still, an average container ship running on typical high-sulfur fuel emits nearly the same amount of sulfur oxides (SOx) as 10 million diesel passenger cars. By

Washington State bill will require trucks serving ports to be cleaner

By Sam Sklar All drayage trucks serving the ports of Seattle and Tacoma will need to be cleaner under a bill in the state legislature. At that time, trucks moving into and out of these high-volume ports would be required to have engines manufactured in 2007 or later. The state bill extends the

Cleaning up the commercial diesel truck industry

By Logan Dredske In 2011, U.S. EPA and NHTSA established a national program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and set new fuel efficiency standards for commercial vehicles starting in 2014. The requirements of this program are a driving force that is causing manufacturers to advance diesel

Reducing traffic congestion in cities by delivering goods at night

By Logan Dredske Shifting store, restaurant, and other business deliveries to nighttime hours could reduce traffic congestion within cities. A study conducted by the KTH Integrated Transport Research Lab (ITRL) in Stockholm, Sweden, has found that scheduling deliveries to businesses during

Death by a thousand trucks: Managing urban freight congestion

By Mary Ebeling As urban residents place orders for online goods with increasing frequency, the challenge of managing urban freight deliveries grows. City street networks—designed for transit, walking, and biking—are unable to handle this level of freight traffic. Cities, freight haulers, and

Maybe urban truck traffic isn’t rising after all

By Bill Holloway One of my posts from last year, which raised the possibility that we may be in the midst of a major increase in urban truck traffic—and the analysis by the Brookings Institution on which it was based—was recently called out as flawed in a blog post by Joe Cortright of City

California’s new fee on hazardous railroad shipments being challenged by railroads

By Bill Holloway California’s new fee on rail deliveries of certain hazardous chemicals, including crude oil, is being challenged in federal court by BNSF and Union Pacific railroads. As noted in the LA Times, the new state regulation, set to take effect this year, requires railroad companies

Breathe easy: Sleep apnea and transportation safety

By Mary Ebeling Obstructive sleep apnea is a respiratory disorder that causes breathing to stop and start repeatedly during sleep, sometimes as many as 400 times a night. The condition results in increased daytime drowsiness and reduced reaction time among sufferers, and this has drawn the