fees

Chicago to use TNC fees to improve ‘L’ service

By Brian Lutenegger Chicago was the first U.S. jurisdiction to collect a per-ride charge from ride-hailing passengers. Now, Chicago and its transit authority are earmarking a recent increase in that fee to transit improvements and have just announced the specific locations of the projects. Other

Offsetting loss of public transit revenue due to ride-hailing services

By Logan Dredske Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is proposing an increase in the city’s fee charged to ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft to offset the loss of revenue from public transit users who switched to ride-hailing services. Currently, the city charges Uber and Lyft 52 cents per

California’s new fee on hazardous railroad shipments being challenged by railroads

By Bill Holloway California’s new fee on rail deliveries of certain hazardous chemicals, including crude oil, is being challenged in federal court by BNSF and Union Pacific railroads. As noted in the LA Times, the new state regulation, set to take effect this year, requires railroad companies

Oregon user-fee launches July 1 with three program options

By Robbie Webber The first program to charge a per-mile fee to drivers will launch July 1 in Oregon. Although beginning with only 5,000 volunteers, the program will continue to expand as an alternative to reliance on the gas tax. Other states are considering similar programs as gas tax revenues

North Carolina seeks to recoup costs of services to developers

By Robbie Webber The 2014 North Carolina budget bill mandated recommendations for new fees to cover the cost of services at many state agencies. This effort was supported by the DOT, and they have now released a proposed list of fees for services provided along state roads, possibly raising the

Roads buckling under the weight of the shale gas industry

By Bill Holloway As hydraulic fracturing technology has made it possible to extract natural gas from reserves across the U.S., many states and small towns are facing the challenge of how to prevent their roads from being destroyed by the industry’s trucks. Though each individual well requires