equity

Toward transportation equity

By Michael Brenneis “From redlining to urban renewal to Jim Crow, many communities across North America have been excluded from the decision-making processes that shaped their built environment, and the built environment has in turn cut these groups off from access to opportunity.” say

New report discusses how transportation officials can support health equity

By Rayla Bellis Smart Growth America recently released a new report, The State of Transportation and Health Equity, a field scan looking at the intersection of transportation and health equity in the U.S. today. The report summarizes lessons based on interviews with 92 experts working across

Places with most crash exposure also fear enforcement bias

By Eric Sundquist Low-income and minority Americans face a dilemma: They are disproportionately victimized by our transportation system. And while law enforcement could help, those same Americans are subject to profiling and fines that can lead to economic ruin. SSTI’s mid-November Community of

License-plate readers pose threats to equity and privacy

By Eric Sundquist Automated license-plate readers (ALPRs) and associated software have become inexpensive go-tos for law enforcement and toll collection. They also raise questions about equity and ethics. Axon Enterprises, a vendor of law-enforcement cameras and other devices, has set up an

Priced parking is fair and effective at lowering car use

By Chris McCahill New research out of California looks at the effect of priced parking on commuter mode choice and transportation costs for low-income households. Findings from two studies suggest raising the price of commuter parking by 10 percent could lower car use by as much as three

Inequities in allocation of bike infrastructure investments

By Saumya Jain The pressing need for safer active transportation infrastructure cannot be overlooked anymore, with 2019 being the deadliest year of the century for pedestrians and cyclists. Although federal spending on active transportation increased from $6 million to $835 million from 1990 to

Some bias is evident when ticketing speeders in Burlington, Vermont

By Michael Brenneis The negative safety effects of speeding are well established. The enforcement of speed limits is justified to reduce crashes. But does officer discretion when giving tickets result in bias against one group or another? The results of an analysis of speeding stops in

Transit-oriented development, VMT, and induced gentrification

By Saumya Jain In the last two decades, transit-oriented development (TOD) has become more than just a “jargony buzz phrase” and has caused the housing market to explode near transit hubs. Many cities are focusing their future development plans around transit connectivity, encouraging people

Los Angeles and San Francisco using data to target Vision Zero efforts

By Robbie Webber As cities commit to Vision Zero, they have started to examine intersections and roadway segments with high crash rates, serious injuries, and fatalities to pedestrians. What they have found is that a small percent of roadways account for a large portion of serious crashes. And

Study: Carlessness drives incomes down

By Chet Edelman New York City has its share of income disparity problems. However, in terms of transportation, at least parts of New York stand out as places that live up to the idea of providing equity through multimodal choice. A new paper by David King of Arizona State University and two