crash risk

A systemic approach to pedestrian safety analysis

By Saumya Jain According to the Fatality Analysis Reporting System data, in the last decade 12 percent of all traffic fatalities were pedestrian fatalities, amounting to more than 49,000 deaths. Numbers from the last few years have shown a rise in this percentage. Concerned with these alarming

Climate change killing us in more ways than expected?

By Saumya Jain While the positive relationship between traffic crashes and extreme summer conditions is certainly not unheard of, it is rarely used in practice when designing policies or issuing roadway safety warnings. A recent study in Accident Analysis and Prevention shows that heat waves have

Learning from better bicycle/vehicle crash reporting: Improving safety and infrastructure

By Mary Ebeling A recent study published in the journal Injury Prevention makes a strong case for better bicycle/motor vehicle crash reporting as a way to improve bicycling safety. The quality of these crash reports currently varies widely, with helmet use and use of other protective equipment

Rural routes more dangerous than those in urban areas

By Bill Holloway Following a six-year decline, roadway deaths were up substantially in 2012 with preliminary data indicating a 5% increase over 2011. Texas had the largest increase with a total of 3,339 fatalities in 2012, up more than 400 over 2011. However, annual traffic deaths were up in 38

A Distance-Based Method to Estimate Annual Pedestrian and Bicyclist Exposure in an Urban Environment (FHWA, 2013)

This report describes a methodology for measuring pedestrian and bicyclist exposure based on counts of pedestrian and bicyclist volumes as well as the distances that pedestrians and bicyclists travel on facilities shared with motor vehicles. The distances that pedestrians and bicyclists travel

Bike boxes and lanes may increase “right hook” crashes in some circumstances

By Bill Holloway Portland, Oregon, has been recognized throughout the U.S. for its efforts to both promote bicycling and retrofit its street network to be safer for and more appealing to bicyclists. But a new Portland Bureau of Transportation report seems to indicate that the new designs may be

Poor suffer more crash injuries; greater exposure to traffic, roadway geometry partly to blame

By Eric Sundquist Many studies have shown the poor suffer more injuries and deaths from crashes than do wealthier residents of a city. A new study suggests that the major reason is that poor people are simply exposed to more traffic and more complex intersections in their neighborhoods. The