connectivity

A new future for downtown Rochester: Removing the Inner Loop highway

By Mary Ebeling The City of Rochester’s prospects for removing a segment of their Inner Loop did not always look so rosy. Rochester twice before unsuccessfully applied for federal funds to redo this portion of the expressway in 2009 and 2011. But this was before the city committed to investing

Can parking lot capacity limit transit station capacity?

By Robbie Webber Greater Greater Washington recently outlined the cascade of implications of having poor pedestrian and bicycle connections to some DC-area transit stations in suburban locations. One of the problems they mention is that if walking or bicycling to a station is unappealing or

Buses, rail, and airlines compete for short-distance intercity travel

By Robbie Webber For trips between 100 and 500 miles, express buses, trains, and airlines are all vying for customers and contemplating the future of these shorter trips. At the same time, drivers are seeking relief from crowded highways and high gas prices. Add in the desire of travelers to be

Low-Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2012)

For a bicycling network to attract the widest possible segment of the population, its most fundamental attribute should be low-stress connectivity, that is, providing routes between people’s origins and destinations that do not require cyclists to use links that exceed their tolerance for

Productivity of trains as mobile offices a factor in mode selection

By Robbie Webber Although driving or flying may be faster door-to-door, trains offer something those modes do not: uninterrupted time to work. And this additional work time is starting to be a factor in transportation mode choice for many workers. Although many people attempt to work while

Land Use Impacts on Transport: How Land Use Factors Affect Travel Behavior (Victoria Transportation Policy Institute, 2012)

This paper examines how various land use factors such as density, regional accessibility, mix and roadway connectivity affect travel behavior, including per capita vehicle travel, mode split and nonmotorized travel. This information is useful for evaluating the ability of smart growth, new

Michigan Odyssey reveals transit realities

By Robbie Webber  In late March, 15 transportation advocates embarked on a cross-state trip of Michigan using only transit: local and regional buses, Amtrak, light rail, etc. They started at the Detroit airport and traveled into downtown Detroit for meetings. As noted by author Tom Clynes,

More counting

The Metropolitan Policy Program of the Brookings Institute has developed a comprehensive database and accompanying report that provides a detailed look at transit coverage and connectivity across and within the nation’s major metro areas. Top performers include some cities that may not be the