congestion pricing

Do mileage-based congestion fees hit low-income drivers harder?

By Chet Edelman While there is mounting evidence that demand-based pricing—or congestion tolling—can more efficiently manage highway use, serious concerns continue to arise regarding the system’s disproportionate impacts on low-income drivers. However, a recent study by researchers at

Vancouver commission recommends decongestion fees

By Robbbie Webber A new report released by the Vancouver, BC, Mobility Pricing Independent Commission does not provide a single solution for congestion and delay in Metro Vancouver, but it has undoubtedly generated the type of discussion the authors wanted. The report carefully lays out an

Dynamic tolling benefits highway users in congested areas

By Michael Brenneis Congestion pricing is gaining a foothold in the management of highway vehicular travel, and with good reason. Congestion pricing, sometimes called demand-based pricing or dynamic tolling, is in the early stages of adoption by state DOTs as a congestion-management practice.

Is congestion pricing equitable? Data suggests “yes” in the Portland metro region

By Rayla Bellis Critics of congestion pricing sometimes raise equity as a concern. They question whether charging a higher fee during congested times of day places a disproportionate burden on lower-income individuals who may have no choice but to travel during those times. Economist Joe

Are you being served? Reserving your space on the roadway

By Mary Ebeling For transportation professionals focusing on improving automobile commute times, the idea of enabling a driver to reserve space on a roadway at specific times may seem too good to be true—and it may be.  Such a scheme may be too complicated to implement—at least right

Do transportation agencies value time more than travelers do?

By Bill Holloway Tolled traffic lanes on otherwise unpriced facilities offer a unique opportunity to understand how much people are willing to pay for a faster commute and to truth test the assumptions used by transportation agencies to judge the benefits and costs of potential projects. As noted

Value Pricing and Traffic Reduction Incentives (New Jersey Institute of Technology, 2012)

The Value Pricing theory involves altering the pricing of transportation facilities, so that it can lead to improved service for transportation users, leading to a more productive use of existing transportation capacities. The problem often faced in value pricing experiments is an increase in

Car use down, bicycle and bus use up dramatically since 2001 in London congestion-pricing area

By Mary Ebeling Since London’s congestion pricing plan went into place, traffic patterns have changed significantly. New maps show bicycle and bus/coach use is up and private car and large truck traffic is down. In the graphic below, blue dots represent decreases in car usage, and red dots

Smart Congestion Relief Comprehensive Analysis Of Traffic Congestion Costs and Congestion Reduction Benefits (Victoria Transport Policy Institute, 2012)

This report critically evaluates the methods used to evaluate traffic congestion costs and the benefits of various congestion reduction strategies. Download the full report. 

Pricing For Traffic Safety How Efficient Transport Pricing Can Reduce Roadway Crash Risks (Victoria Transport Policy Institute, 2012)

Transportation pricing reforms can increase safety in addition to other effects due to decreased driving. Download the report.