congestion management

Death by a thousand trucks: Managing urban freight congestion

By Mary Ebeling As urban residents place orders for online goods with increasing frequency, the challenge of managing urban freight deliveries grows. City street networks—designed for transit, walking, and biking—are unable to handle this level of freight traffic. Cities, freight haulers, and

WSDOT accountability report replaces congestion with corridor capacity

By Robbie Webber Washington State Department of Transportation has been rightfully proud of their accountability and transparency with their quarterly Gray Notebook, which details system performance and project delivery. As part of that, they have issued an Annual Congestion Report. But the 2013

HOT lane study points to importance of reliability over average delay

By Eric Sundquist A new University of Minnesota study on driver behavior in managed lanes provides some findings that on the surface seem highly counter-intuitive, but that may have a simple explanation: travelers care more about reliability than delay. The study looked at prices and usage of

Regional TDM Action Plan (Pugest Sound Regional Council, 2013)

This transportation demand management plan from the Puget Sound Regional Council and the TDM Steering Committee lays out strategies to reduce single occupancy car trips through the region. A variety of efforts are outlined, including neighborhood-based alternative transportation education,

Are you being served? Reserving your space on the roadway

By Mary Ebeling For transportation professionals focusing on improving automobile commute times, the idea of enabling a driver to reserve space on a roadway at specific times may seem too good to be true—and it may be.  Such a scheme may be too complicated to implement—at least right

Contrarian research: Transit relieves congestion, but park-and-rides do not

By Robbie Webber Research using the results of a 2003 Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority strike shows that transit does indeed relieve congestion, but only along corridors that parallel heavily used lines. At the same time, research in the Netherlands indicates that

Parking management – an unlikely economic development tool

By Mary Ebeling During the era of interstate highway construction, and the resulting demographic shift from city to suburb, municipalities worked to provide auto access to their downtowns, hoping this access would support economic growth. However, mounting evidence shows that greater automobile

Value Pricing and Traffic Reduction Incentives (New Jersey Institute of Technology, 2012)

The Value Pricing theory involves altering the pricing of transportation facilities, so that it can lead to improved service for transportation users, leading to a more productive use of existing transportation capacities. The problem often faced in value pricing experiments is an increase in

Will drivers pay the price to use fastest road in the Americas?

By Bill Holloway A new stretch of toll road through central Texas linking Austin to San Antonio, State Highway 130, may soon have the highest posted speed limit in the hemisphere. Once completed, sections five and six of the project, totaling 41 miles, may be the first to allow drivers to travel

A transportation engineer rethinks congestion pricing

Congestion pricing in New York City should be easy; there are only bridges and tunnels to get into the most congested areas of the city, and many already have tolls. Access is limited, and transit is plentiful once commuters arrive in congested Manhattan. Despite these facts, political pressures