complete streets

At a crossroads: Complete streets and functional classification

By Mary Ebeling As the demand for more complete, multimodal streets increases, so does the push to alter the functional classification system to allow for greater local flexibility in roadway design.  Principal arterial roadways commonly run through the heart of downtowns, and often serve as the

The Best Complete Streets Policies of 2012 (Smart Growth America, 2013)

Communities across the country are making roads safer and more accessible for everyone who uses them, and more communities are using these strategies now than ever before. This guide from Smart Grown America, released today, examines all the Complete Streets policies passed in the last year and

Complete Streets: Policy Analysis 2011 and Local Policy Workbook (Smart Growth America and National Complete Streets Coalition, 2012)

Smart Growth America has released a report that summarizes surveys of the more than 350 complete streets policies that have been approved by communities across the United States. Also available is the latest edition of the Complete Streets Local Policy Workbook, which is intended to assist

Why “forgiving roadways” are not the solution in urban areas

Roadway designers since the 1960’s have used the concept of “forgiving highways.” This design philosophy attempts to “forgive” driver error on interstates and freeways by providing wide, obstacle-free clear zones, burying the end of roadside guardrails and flattening or rounding slopes

Complete Streets: We Can Get There from Here (ITE, 2008)

This report explains the Complete Streets movement and assesses ways to make urban thoroughfares more pedestrian and bike friendly without compromising existing automobile travel. Download the full report here.

A small city tries to fund sidewalk improvements

Missoula, Montana—a city of roughly 70,000 people— for decades had a policy similar to many cities of allowing property owners to decide if they wanted a sidewalk, and pay for it themselves. This created city streets that resembled “broken teeth,” where properties with sidewalks were next

Complete streets in New York State

New York State’s legislature passed a complete streets bill to require that planners consider bike and pedestrian friendly features when designing and building roads. Over the last ten years, 3000 pedestrians have died on New York roads. While advocates for safer street design wanted more