commuting

Priced parking is fair and effective at lowering car use

By Chris McCahill New research out of California looks at the effect of priced parking on commuter mode choice and transportation costs for low-income households. Findings from two studies suggest raising the price of commuter parking by 10 percent could lower car use by as much as three

Shorter commutes make for more reliable workers

By Chris McCahill There’s no shortage of research suggesting that longer commutes can take a toll on workers’ health and happiness. But if that doesn’t concern employers and public officials, a new study out of Australia shows that longer commutes also translate into lower job performance

An app that rewards commuters for their travel choices

By Chet Edelman Everyday navigation apps such as Google Maps and Waze use real-time traffic data to help millions of people find the fastest route to work. A new app called incenTrip emulates the same model but with a twist—it incentivizes commuters to take greener, more eco-conscious trips.

Among other barriers, low-wage workers face discrimination based on commute distance

By Michael Brenneis Along with lack of access to transportation options in areas outside the urban core, low-wage workers also face another obstacle in finding work. Discrimination by commute distance is significant when applying for low-wage jobs, concludes a new study. Affluence and long

Does telecommuting increase vehicle miles traveled?

By Logan Dredske Recent research published in the Journal of Transport & Health analyzed the impact telecommuting has on vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The research, conducted by Sandip Chakrabarti, used the 2009 National Household Travel Survey to compare daily VMT for those who frequently

The psychology of daily versus monthly parking fees

By Brian Lutenegger The Seattle Times recently reported on the experiences of several major employers trying innovative ways to charge for commuter parking. These employers found that how parking for commuters is priced—on a daily vs. a monthly basis—makes a big difference in their

Downtown Seattle’s drive-alone commute share drops to 30 percent

By Robbie Webber Despite an influx of jobs in Seattle’s downtown area, the number of people driving to work has barely changed since 2010. According to a survey from Commute Seattle, a non-profit working with downtown employers, the working population in and around downtown increased by

New research reinforces the importance of the built environment to cycling mode share

By Bill Holloway A recently published study sheds new light on the importance of the built environment in influencing bicycle commuting and the resulting impacts on greenhouse gas emissions. The researchers first gathered household travel survey data for the years 1998, 2003, and 2008 for

WSDOT’s longstanding TDM program getting much deserved recognition

By Bill Holloway Since 1991, the Washington State DOT has been working with employers to reduce the number of people driving to work alone through the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program. A recent CityLab article, by Eric Jaffe, highlights the program’s impressive impact on driving habits and

San Francisco Bay Area MPO launches interactive performance measure portal

By Eric Sundquist The Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which has drawn attention for its rigorous performance measure-driven transportation plan (SSTI webinar here), is expanding its use of performance measures with a publicly accessible portal called Vital Signs. Launched on January 28,