cities

The Nature of Context-Sensitive Solutions, Stakeholder Involvement and Critical Issues in the Urban Context (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2011)

Many transportation and planning agencies experience conflicting demands emerging from the need to develop projects in an expeditious manner while at the same time involving stakeholders in the decision-making process. This study examines the issue in the context of a relatively new policy

Report documents the continued rise of walking and biking

A new benchmarking report from the Alliance for Biking and Walking shows a 57 percent growth in bike commuting in the United States and a 29 percent rise in pedestrian fatalities in large cities between 2000 and 2009. At the same time, federal funding – for both infrastructure and safety –

Bicycling and Walking in the U.S.: 2012 Benchmarking Report (Alliance for Biking and Walking, 2012)

This 3rd biennial benchmarking report looks at data and policies in all 50 states and the 51 largest US cities to examine how they stack up for walking and biking. This is a useful tool for local and state officials that would like to improve conditions and safety for bicyclists and pedestrians,

A small city tries to fund sidewalk improvements

Missoula, Montana—a city of roughly 70,000 people— for decades had a policy similar to many cities of allowing property owners to decide if they wanted a sidewalk, and pay for it themselves. This created city streets that resembled “broken teeth,” where properties with sidewalks were next

Golden, CO, stands firm against Denver’s Beltway expansion

For now, it appears that Golden, Colorado, a city just west of Denver in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, has successfully blocked the expansion of Denver’s beltway, noted in a recent New York Times article. As proposed, the highway would run directly through the center of Golden,

Bike sharing takes off in America

Cities across the country, from large (Chicago) to small (Spartanburg, SC) have implemented bike sharing programs over the last few years, but 2011 seems to be the year that these programs really took off. Most urban bike-sharing programs have similar characteristics. They are intended to

Where we are today: Five-year trend from 2005 to 2010 shows less commuting by car

New Census data for 2010 show a gradual trend toward less commuting by car and truck, and more by transit, walking and biking. In the nation as a whole, driving to work edged down to 90.2 percent from 90.9 percent five years earlier. Transit rose to 4.9 percent from 4.7 percent, while ped-bike

Car of the future.

To make the car of the future, we need to make the city of the future, says an MIT designer. In his article in The Futurist Ryan Chin describes a new breed of lightweight, compact, alternative-fueled, shared-use vehicles that he expects to radically alter urban mobility and the future of cities.

More counting

The Metropolitan Policy Program of the Brookings Institute has developed a comprehensive database and accompanying report that provides a detailed look at transit coverage and connectivity across and within the nation’s major metro areas. Top performers include some cities that may not be the