cities

Effects of Parking Provision on Automobile Use in Cities: Inferring Causality (McCahill, Garrick, Atkinson-Palombo and Polinski, 2015)

In a paper presented at the 2016 TRB Annual Meeting, SSTI Senior Associate Chris McCahill and colleagues from University of Connecticut examined the cause and effect of parking and driving habits. Automobile use has been on the rise in cities for nearly a century and so has the supply of

Parking increases citywide car use, SSTI researcher finds

By Chris McCahill Automobile use has been on the rise in cities for nearly a century and so has the supply of parking. Because driving often seems unavoidable, policymakers, developers and the public push endlessly for more parking to meet demand. That push, however, might only be making matters

Measuring Urban Transportation Performance: A Critique of Mobility Measures and a Synthesis (CEOs for Cities, 2010)

While peak hour travel is a perennial headache for many Americans — peak hour travel times average 200 hours a year in large metropolitan areas — some cities have managed to achieve shorter travel times and actually reduce the peak hour travel times. The key is that some metropolitan

One-way or two-way streets more efficient? It depends on what you measure

By Chris Spahr The debate over one-way versus two-way streets has been ongoing for more than half a century in American cities. Counter to prevailing engineering wisdom, a new study finds two-way streets may be more efficient, if one is measuring getting people to their destinations. Many cities

Cities feel left out of transportation discussion

By Robbie Webber Just before Super Storm Sandy came to town and made a mess of New York’s infrastructure, transportation officials from the largest U.S. cities gathered for the first national conference of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). Out of that

Report shows that higher congestion is associated with better economies

By Eric Sunquist While transportation agencies gamely battle to reduce congestion with diminishing resources, a new report suggests that traffic jams may have a good side. They are linked to strong economies. Eric Dumbaugh of Florida Atlantic University, writing in The Atlantic Cities,

Cycling to work in 90 large American cities: New evidence on the role of bike paths and lanes (Beuhler and Pucher, 2011)

This article analyzes the variation in bike commuting in large American cities, with a focus on assessing the influence of bike paths and lanes, which have been the main approach to increasing cycling in the USA. Download the full article.

Exurban development continues to decline, while cities return to pre-recession growth

By Eric Sundquist  Growth in urban-fringe suburbs, once the fastest-growing parts of metropolitan areas, has stalled, new Census data shows. From 1990 through the mid-2000s, growth in exurban counties was running at about 2 percent per year, according to an analysis by the Brookings Institution.

New report proposes ways to increase municipal infrastructure investment

By Glenn  Halstead  A new report from IBM argues that the health of the country depends on the health of our cities. However, the current “business model” of most local governments is not sustainable in the current environment of budget cuts and little to no local revenue growth. Local

“Patent troll” targets transit agencies over vehicle tracking apps

For years, technology companies have battled “patent trolls,” individuals and firms that do not produce products, but instead sue to assert patent rights to various innovations. A working paper from Boston University Law School, charges that such lawsuits drained $500 billion from tech