census

Highway congestion highest on Friday afternoon

By Eric Sunquist Car commuters in most large metro areas face the highest level of highway congestion on Friday afternoon, according to Inrix data provided to Governing magazine. In Los Angeles – the city with the worst traffic – a 30-minute auto trip in traffic-free conditions becomes a

Exurban development continues to decline, while cities return to pre-recession growth

By Eric Sundquist  Growth in urban-fringe suburbs, once the fastest-growing parts of metropolitan areas, has stalled, new Census data shows. From 1990 through the mid-2000s, growth in exurban counties was running at about 2 percent per year, according to an analysis by the Brookings Institution.

Where we are today: Five-year trend from 2005 to 2010 shows less commuting by car

New Census data for 2010 show a gradual trend toward less commuting by car and truck, and more by transit, walking and biking. In the nation as a whole, driving to work edged down to 90.2 percent from 90.9 percent five years earlier. Transit rose to 4.9 percent from 4.7 percent, while ped-bike

States’ work to make biking safer.

The good news on bicycling is that states are moving to make bicycling safer, according to a report in USA Today (available here) that describes measures that states are taking and links to a “ranking on bicycle friendliness” done by the League of American Bicyclists. (Top Five: Washington,

NYC counts travel with greater detail.

Accurate figures about who is using the road, and the sidewalk, are one of the many elements in allocating transportation dollars. New York City is not content with the way the census counts how people get around. A recent New York Times article quotes the city’s transportation commissioner: