carpooling

Do HOV to HOT conversions decrease carpooling?

By Robbie Webber A study from Texas A&M asks whether carpooling decreases when lanes are converted from high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes to lanes allowing solo drivers to pay a toll. Their conclusion: it depends. The researchers studied eight roadway segments in six states and found that

Decline in carpooling could signal availability of more transportation options

By Bill Holloway New data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows fewer commuters carpooled to work in 2013 compared to 2012. Over the past five years the share of commuters traveling in a carpool has declined from 10.04% to 9.36%. Washington State, which has actively promoted carpooling through

Oregon DOT promotes Drive Less Challenge

By Dan Moser On October 21, Oregon Department of Transportation and its regional transportation partners launched the first statewide Oregon Drive Less Challenge.  The immediate goal of the campaign is to reduce statewide vehicle miles traveled in single occupancy vehicles by half a million

Making room for the slugs

By Bill Holloway The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) is now taking slugs—otherwise known as “casual carpoolers”—into account when designing commuter parking lots. Although Virginia law prohibits people from soliciting rides on the side of the road, when it comes to slugging,

Carpooling apps cut commuting costs

An article published earlier this month on the Cartech blog details ways that smartphone applications can facilitate ridesharing. “Now that hybrid vehicles lost their single-occupancy privileges in California carpool lanes, ride sharing could start to sound a lot more appealing to commuters. To

Where are they going?

The reduction in VMT does not necessarily mean that people are traveling less. Transit, car-sharing, casual car-pooling and bicycling are growing. APTA reports that “$5 a Gallon Gas Could Spur Up to 1.5 Billion Additional Passenger Trips On U.S. Public Transportation Systems.”