Boston

Overabundant parking fuels car-oriented living in greater Boston

By Chris McCahill A new report from the Metropolitan Area Planning Council reveals 30 percent of residential parking in the Boston area goes unused at night. This new study builds on an earlier report, featured in an SSTI webinar, growing the sample from 80 properties to 189 across 14

Reopening of Quincy Station MBTA gate provides area households with access to hundreds of thousands of additional jobs

By Chet Edelman After sitting shuttered for more than 30 years, the city of Quincy, MA recently reopened a pedestrian gate that allows residents of the town’s Penn’s Hill neighborhood to connect directly to the Quincy Adams MBTA station. Previous to the gate reopening, residents were forced

Private transit funding, public good?

By Robbie Webber Businesses have been funding private employee shuttles and buses for some time, and subsidized or fully-funded transit passes have become a common employee benefit, but sneaker company New Balance may have set a new bar for transit subsidies. As part of a 14-acre development to

The New Real Estate Mantra: Location Near Public Transportation (APTA, National Association of Realtors & CNT, 2013)

This analysis investigates how well residential properties located in proximity to fixed-guideway transit have maintained their value as compared to residential properties without transit access between 2006 and 2011 in five regions: Boston, Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, and San

Stockholm’s congestion charge still going strong

By Bill Holloway Stockholm’s congestion pricing system, which charges between €1 and €2 (US$1.30- $2.60) to drivers traveling into the central city during rush hour, is a continuing success six years after its initial implementation. While there was speculation that drivers would soon

Cities feel left out of transportation discussion

By Robbie Webber Just before Super Storm Sandy came to town and made a mess of New York’s infrastructure, transportation officials from the largest U.S. cities gathered for the first national conference of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). Out of that

New generation of transit hubs redefining train stations’ place in communities

By Bill Holloway Whereas the grand train stations of yesteryear were monuments to transportation with their soaring cathedral-like ceilings, huge open spaces, and rows of wooden benches – today’s transit hubs have both a new aesthetic and role in their communities. They often link multiple

Hub and Spoke: Core Transit Congestion and the Future of Transit and Development in Greater Boston (Urban Land Institute, 2012)

The hub and spoke system of the MBTA has produced record ridership, transit-oriented development patterns, and severe challenges for the system. The report focuses on the need to invest in public transit infrastructure so that the MBTA can serve its growing transit ridership, including future

Bike sharing takes off in America

Cities across the country, from large (Chicago) to small (Spartanburg, SC) have implemented bike sharing programs over the last few years, but 2011 seems to be the year that these programs really took off. Most urban bike-sharing programs have similar characteristics. They are intended to