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Montana and North Dakota show need for transit service in rural areas

By Mary Ebeling Transit services provide critical connectivity within and between communities of all sizes—urban and rural. A robust transportation system that includes public transit provides access to goods and services, and economic opportunity for those who cannot, or choose not to, drive.

Transportation, Mobility, and Older Adults in Rural Michigan (University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute Behavioral Sciences Group, 2012)

Mobility, or the ability to get from place to place, is important for everyone. Mobility enables people to conduct the activities of daily life, stay socially connected with their world, participate in activities that make life enjoyable, and maintain their quality of life. In the United States

Aging in Place, Stuck Without Options (Transportation for America, 2011)

By 2015, more than 15.5 million Americans 65 and older will live in communities where public transportation service is poor or non-existent. That number is expected to continue to grow rapidly as the baby boom generation “ages in place” in suburbs and exurbs with few mobility options for

Transit funding shrinks despite increasing ridership

A recent New York Times article notes that, since 1995, transit ridership in the U.S. has grown by 31 percent, outstripping both VMT and population.  This is true even in cities that lack good transit systems. The growth is attributed to increasing numbers of baby boomer retirees riding

Is declining car use a long-term trend or just a short-term reaction to the recession?

In ‘Peak Car Use’: Understanding the Demise of Automobile Dependence, published last month in World Transport Policy and Practice, Peter Newman and Jeff Kenworthy, of the Curtin University Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute in Australia, summarize recent data suggesting a long-term shift

A less mobile future for America’s baby boomers

A new report by Transportation for America, Aging in Place, Stuck without Options: Fixing the Mobility Crisis Threatening the Baby Boom Generation, investigates the growing problem of senior citizens who, having lived in car-dependent communities and “aged in place,” face isolation, economic