access

The cost and inequity of children’s access to opportunity

By Michael Brenneis Housing and transportation are the two biggest expenses for average households in the United States, and geographic location has a significant impact on these costs. But living in areas with affordable housing and transportation is not enough to assure that children will

Where people walk: Two new studies improve “walkability” measurement

By Chris McCahill In planning and designing for pedestrians, sidewalks are often a good start but rarely make a place walkable on their own. Measuring pedestrian accessibility (the topic of a recent SSTI webinar) depends on two important pieces of information: 1) where destinations are located,

Connecting Sacramento

New tools and data sources have begun to change the way we think about and plan for meeting people’s transportation needs. Accessibility analysis lets us measure transportation performance in terms of people’s ability to reach destinations instead of simply how fast cars move or whether

A toolkit to measure and value “community severance” due to traffic

By Erin Evenhouse A high-traffic road can divide a community in more ways than one. Researchers haven’t always been able to show to what extent such roads can harm a community’s access, health, or quality of life. A new study outlined in the latest volume of the Journal of Transport and

Accessibility for all: Open source options for measuring access to destinations

By Chris McCahill As highlighted in two recent SSTI webinars in March and April of this year, accessibility measures are becoming more useful in practice. The most notable examples rely on proprietary data and methods, but open source approaches are also gaining traction, while highlighting the

Balancing transportation investments to maximize access: Connecting nonmotorized trips with transit

By Mary Ebeling New research from the Mineta Transportation Institute contributes essential insights into improving transit access for nonmotorized transportation. Researchers assert that a city should develop a low-stress road network while balancing these improvements with the desire for

Big data shines light on bike and pedestrian trips

By Chris McCahill New applications in big data could soon let us understand precisely how people move around by bike and on foot, for all types of trips, almost anywhere in the country. SSTI has worked with several providers to better understand the available trip data and its useful

Trip-making and accessibility: New tools, better decisions (SSTI, 2016)

Transportation researchers and practitioners have long sought other tools to complement or perhaps replace conventional methods—tools that would better analyze trips rather than speed at points in the system, speak to non-auto modes of travel, address land use solutions as well as highway

Not just speed and land use: considering directness of travel

By Eric Sundquist Improving access to destinations means raising travel speed or reducing travel distance. Because of siloing within government, transportation agencies have traditionally worried about speed while leaving distances to land use authorities (though that is beginning to change with

Vermont taking steps to reduce the number of drivers with suspended licenses

By Bill Holloway The Vermont Agency of Transportation is working to reduce the number of state residents with suspended licenses. As reported by Vermont Public Radio, there are about 30,000 Vermonters with suspended licenses at any time in the state with 626,000 people. The majority of these