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Planning for resilience in Vermont

By Michael Brenneis The Vermont Agency of Transportation, along with a list of partners (p. iv), has developed a planning tool to identify and prioritize parts of the transportation network most at risk of flooding, fluvial erosion, landslides, or other natural disasters. The need for a

How reliable are traffic forecasts?

By Chris McCahill As reliant on traffic forecasts as transportation agencies are to plan and design road projects, those forecasts are rarely evaluated to see how well they held up after project implementation. A massive new study, outlined in a recent NCHRP report, fills that gap. It compares

The persistence of pedestrianism

By Robbie Webber An investigation of the “persistence of pedestrianism,” written by Peter Norton and published by Cambridge University Press, explores the history of both the rise of the dominance of automobiles as personal transportation and the continuing pushback by pedestrian advocates

Why DOTs need more workforce diversity

By Rayla Bellis Many state DOTs around the country are currently contending with challenging workforce issues, whether attracting and retaining talented workers while competing with the private sector or preserving institutional knowledge amidst a wave of baby boomer retirements. An article in

ITE Journal: advisory bike lanes are safe and effective

By Eric Sundquist Since 2010, a new design for accommodating active transportation has been slowly growing in popularity in North America. The “advisory bike lane” (ABL) or “advisory shoulder” design, also known as “edge lane roads,” provides bike and/or pedestrian space on each side

As car commuting demand changes, highways and parking lots give way to development

By Michael Brenneis Urban highways and plentiful surface parking lots, once considered essential, have outlived their promise in many large U.S. cities. Observers see growing interest in dense urban living, with some mobile segments of the population opting out of car-dependent suburbs. Bold

On-demand transportation services as a complement of public transit

By Yicong Yang A recent article reports that on-demand transportation can complement existing transit and help cities reduce traffic by up to 15 to 30 percent. The original study was conducted jointly by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and Via Transportation, Inc., a private transportation network

Places with most crash exposure also fear enforcement bias

By Eric Sundquist Low-income and minority Americans face a dilemma: They are disproportionately victimized by our transportation system. And while law enforcement could help, those same Americans are subject to profiling and fines that can lead to economic ruin. SSTI’s mid-November Community of

LOS to play more limited role in California planning, according to survey

By Chris McCahill A new survey of planning officials in California finds that most are embracing the shift from highway level of service to vehicle miles traveled for evaluating the environmental impacts of new development projects. While some are ditching LOS altogether, however, many still rely

How might travelers behave with privately-owned AVs?

By Michael Brenneis In many ways, we can only speculate about a future with autonomous vehicles on the road. The effects on vehicle miles traveled are expected to be very different if AVs are privately owned versus shared. A recent post by Aaron Gordon on Jalopnick drew our attention to a

App cuts double parking by delivery drivers in DC

by Robbie Webber Like many cities, Washington, DC, has a problem with double parking and delivery vehicles blocking crosswalks and bus and bike lanes. One experiment in curb management showed good results during its trial run from August to October. Using the curbFlow app, delivery drivers can

Why didn’t the turtles cross the road?

By Rayla Bellis A study from Ohio University evaluating the impacts of a new bypass on Eastern Box Turtles found unexpected results: turtles living next to the bypass did not exhibit heightened stress levels, but not one of them crossed the road over a two year period, including via a

License-plate readers pose threats to equity and privacy

By Eric Sundquist Automated license-plate readers (ALPRs) and associated software have become inexpensive go-tos for law enforcement and toll collection. They also raise questions about equity and ethics. Axon Enterprises, a vendor of law-enforcement cameras and other devices, has set up an

Nighttime pedestrian fatalities soar

By Robbie Webber Although we are now past Halloween—the night of the year with the highest number of pedestrian crashes—we still have work to do on improving the safety of walking at night. While other crash types have gone down, pedestrian and bicycle crashes continue to rise, and crashes

Is there bias in GPS enabled smartphone cycling app data?

By Michael Brenneis Smartphones with GPS tracking ability are capable of collecting large amounts of pedestrian and cyclist movement data. But do tracking apps developed largely for athletic or route-planning use capture the big picture of where pedestrians and cyclists travel and what