Latest News

Neighborhood perspectives on gentrification around light rail in Denver

By Rayla Bellis Recent research in Denver aimed to provide a more nuanced answer to the question of how light rail and transit-oriented development have contributed to gentrification. While previous studies have looked at this issue quantitatively, in this case the researchers analyzed

Sweden and Virginia: Messaging and variable tolls can influence mode choice

By Robbie Webber Two recent studies—one practical and one academic—show two approaches to reducing driving. A Swedish study looked at what types of messages influence the choice to drive, while a report from Virginia shows that tolls on the I-66 corridor outside Washington have made a

Cars park improperly substantially more than scooters or bikes

By Michael Brenneis If media accounts are to be taken at face value, it would seem that micromobility devices, such as scooters and bicycles—sometimes characterized as a “scourge”—are scattered about in the public right- of-way, impeding everyone. Some cities are implementing

Big Data sources for understanding non-motorized travel patterns

By Saumya Jain Researchers from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute recently published a paper that discusses the top sources for individually-acquired pedestrian and bicycle travel data assimilated from a variety of sources. This could help us understand how to solve the complexities of

Dueling congestion reports released

By Eric Sundquist Two reports issued within days provide contrasting takes on the enduring issue of highway traffic congestion. One report from traffic-data firm Inrix is an update of previous scorecards that rank world cities for highway delay, calculated by aggregating travel times slower than

Webinar recap: Parking reform for 21st century communities

By Chris McCahill Parking reform is a growing priority for cities and towns across the U.S. This has important implications for transportation professionals, outlined in a recent webinar from SSTI, the Form-Based Code Institute, and Smart Growth America. The webinar featured lessons from Hartford

New ITE guidelines for yellow light timing

By Michael Brenneis Yellow lights are provided to alert drivers to the need to stop for a coming red, or to allow them to enter an intersection if they can’t safely stop. While there is no federal standard for the length of a yellow light, states have generally relied on a kinematic solution,

Can travel demand models predict cycling?

By Chris McCahill Try asking a conventional travel demand model about bicycle trips and you might get anything from an educated guess to an error message. A recent study from Sweden, however, shows what it takes to fix them. The short answer is to make the models much bigger. That leaves an

Does Uber impact bike-share usage? Evidence from a natural experiment in Budapest

By Rayla Bellis Significant research has gone into understanding the relationships between different urban transportation options and whether they support or compete with each other. It seems reasonable to think ride-hailing services like Uber might compete with bike sharing in urban areas, but

Impact of “new age” shopping behavior on VMT and the environment

By Saumya Jain With the constant increase in retail sales from e-commerce, there have been a number of studies studying the relationship between in-store and online shopping behavior and its impact on retail-related travel. Though few studies suggest that the relationship might be complementary,

Short commutes and multimodal access motivate housing choices

By Chris McCahill In choosing where to live, people strive for a combination of short driving commutes and good transit access, according to a new study spanning three large regions: Atlanta, Seattle, and Detroit. Walkable neighborhoods are also a plus, depending on the region. For this study,

Toward transportation equity

By Michael Brenneis “From redlining to urban renewal to Jim Crow, many communities across North America have been excluded from the decision-making processes that shaped their built environment, and the built environment has in turn cut these groups off from access to opportunity.” say

In Silicon Valley, private shuttles not just for tech workers anymore

By Robbie Webber A recent article from Protocol, a newsletter devoted to the tech industry, details the twin and intertwined problems of very long commutes and the lack of adequate housing in Silicon Valley. Most of us have heard of the so-called “Google buses”—private shuttles run by tech

The argument for ending single-family zoning

By Rayla Bellis An article in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Planning Association makes a case for getting rid of single-family zoning in U.S. cities. The authors, professors at UCLA’s Department of Urban Planning, argue that single-family zoning (often called “R1” zoning)

The incompatibility of Vision Zero and VMT growth

By Eric Sundquist The U.S. transportation field has tried many things to reduce traffic crashes, fatalities, and injuries: drunk-driving and seatbelt laws; in-vehicle safety improvements; wide, straight roads with crash zones; graduated licensing; and more. Yet traffic crashes still kill