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85th percentile speed limits: “Fast, Furious & Fatal”

By Eric Sundquist In 2017, when the City of Los Angeles reviewed operating speeds across its system, it ended up raising speed limits on 89 miles of roadway. Why would a city with a Vision Zero goal raise speed limits in corridors with a history of crashes? Because of a California statute that

The cost and inequity of children’s access to opportunity

By Michael Brenneis Housing and transportation are the two biggest expenses for average households in the United States, and geographic location has a significant impact on these costs. But living in areas with affordable housing and transportation is not enough to assure that children will

Study finds women use carsharing less than men

By Robert Benner A recent study out of Transportation Research Procedia has found that women are less likely than men to use carsharing services due to childcare, household duties, and the need to make “chain trips” across multiple destinations for a variety of errands. Even in Germany—the

IPCC finds taxes, regulations mix most effective for vehicle emissions reductions

By Chet Edelman According to the recent report released by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a mere 1.5 degree Celsius rise in mean global temperature will unleash climate devastation on a unprecedented scale. The report stresses that avoiding the worst effects of climate change

How do we prepare for the “hockey stick growth” of the EV market?

By Saumya Jain The latest forecasts by Bloomberg show the current sales of electric vehicles increasing from 1 million worldwide, to 11 million in 2025, and then surging to 30 million in 2030. Many other forecasts come very close, and a recent report by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

New study details non-emission particulates

By Michael Brenneis Greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles deserve a lot of attention, but particulates from vehicles are also a significant health concern. Tiny soot particles can be inhaled deeply into the lungs. Larger-sized particles can contaminate nearby fields and groundwater, and deliver

Traffic death rates stabilize as Americans ease off driving

By Chris McCahill Traffic fatalities held steady around 37,000 in 2017, following a 14 percent jump over the previous two years, and 2018 is on track for a similar number according to new data from NHTSA and the National Safety Council. Once again, this points to the most consistent cause of high

Study finds rich and poor most likely to walk

By Chet Edelman As a percentage of all commutes, walking accounts for less than three percent of all trips in the United States. But not all groups in the country walk at the same rate. A new study from the University of Virginia reveals that a distinct socioeconomic divide exists. More

Planners reevaluate parking requirements for affordable housing

By Brian Lutenegger The most recent issue of Planning, the magazine of the American Planning Association, examines how cutting parking requirements can also improve the supply of affordable housing. Minneapolis lowered multifamily parking requirements in some neighborhoods and the market

Lyft tests mobility as a service across major U.S. cities

By Eric Sundquist The move toward “mobility as a service” (MaaS) took a step forward last week when Lyft expanded a pilot program, for people who agree not to drive a private car, to dozens of cities. The “Ditch Your Car Challenge” program, initially offered just in Chicago but now in 35

Lowering speed limits can reduce crashes

By Chris McCahill Speed limits are often based on observed 85th percentile free flow speeds. Setting them lower, even to address safety concerns, can be difficult once engineering recommendations have been made. A new study, however, bolsters the case for doing so by showing that setting limits

Will advances in autonomous technology degrade job quality in the trucking industry?

By Michael Brenneis While advances in autonomous technology may net additional jobs in the trucking sector, without thoughtful public policy and a commitment to equitable private practices, they may end up being some of the worst the industry has to offer, and come at the expense of jobs at the

An app that rewards commuters for their travel choices

By Chet Edelman Everyday navigation apps such as Google Maps and Waze use real-time traffic data to help millions of people find the fastest route to work. A new app called incenTrip emulates the same model but with a twist—it incentivizes commuters to take greener, more eco-conscious trips.

Can we bring back the golden era of transit in the U.S.?

By Saumya Jain “One hundred years ago, the United States had a public transportation system that was the envy of the world.” – Jonathan English, Citylab. A recent statistics brief by Union Internationale des Transports Publics compares transit ridership and metro infrastructure development

Study finds risky driving still a problem around schools

By Saumya Jain Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among school children. Although some cities and schools that have implemented safety programs around schools have seen decreases in dangerous driving in school zones, those improvements have been more than offset by worsening driver