Pricing

Report of Minnesota’s Mileage-Based User Fee Policy Task Force (Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 2011)

Over a period of six months, the Task Force, appointed by Minnesota Department of Transportation Commissioner Tom Sorel, discussed and evaluated the overall MBUF concept and related issues, determined benefits and concerns, considered potential system design options and preferences and formulated

Housing and Transportation Affordability Index (CNT, n.d.)

Website demonstrating that when transportation costs are included, exurban areas are very expensive to live in, even though real estate is cheap. Go to website

Five Easy Pieces: Pay-As-You-Drive Auto Insurance (Center for State Innovation, n.d.)

Brief introduction to pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) auto insurance, outlining the its benefits and costs. Download Five Easy Pieces: Pay-As-You-Drive

Aging in Place, Stuck Without Options: Fixing the Mobility Crisis Threatening the Baby Boom Generation (Transportation for America, 2011)

Outlines the problems posed by baby boomers “aging in place” in car-dependent communities, examines potential solutions, and ranks metro areas by the percentage of seniors with poor access to public transportation, now and in the coming years. Read more here.

Road Pricing: Public Perceptions and Program Development (NCHRP Report 686, 2011)

This report describes road pricing concepts and discusses their potential effectiveness and applicability. It also provides guidelines for project planning and integrating pricing into regional and state planning processes, and for communicating strategies and engaging affected parties. Download

The High Cost of Free Parking (Shoup, 2005)

Parking is a huge determinant of the amount of driving we do and the shape of the built environment, and past policy has been to remove price signals, creating excessive demand. Read more here.

Pay-As-You-Drive Auto Insurance: A Simple Way to Reduce Driving-Related Harms and Increase Equity (Brookings, 2008)

Auto insurance costs about as much as fuel, but we basically pay for it at a flat rate, so there are no efficient price signals. Low-mileage, often low-income drivers subsidize higher mileage, generally high-income drivers, and the total amount of driving is much more than it would be with better

Driven to Spend (STPP, 2000)

Examines the cost of inefficient, sprawling transportation systems to citizens, especially those with low incomes. Read more here.