Livability

Guidebook for Measuring Multimodal Network Connectivity (FHWA, February 2018)

Active transportation works best when networks are well-connected and destinations compactly arranged. Yet while the field has standard metrics and methods for many other aspects of the transportation system, it performs connectivity analyses as one-offs or not at all. FHWA’s new guide

Accessible Shared Streets: Notable Practices and Considerations for Accommodating Pedestrians with Vision Disabilities (FHWA, FHWA, October 2017)

Shared streets, which serve both slow-moving motor vehicles and pedestrians, can provide flexible, desirable public spaces. However, they provide a challenge for pedestrians with vision impairments. FHWA’s guide provides a toolbox of design options, as well as planning guidance and case

Pedestrians First: Tools for a Walkable City (ITDP, 2018)

The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy recently released Pedestrians First: Tools for a Walkable City. The toolkit, aimed at governments, city planners, NGOs, and developers, notes that “Walkability is the foundation of any type of transportation; all trips require walking at

Accessibility in practice (SSTI and Virginia Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment, 2017)

Planning agencies and transportation decision makers often talk about the importance of improving access to destinations, but they rarely have the tools or resources to measure accessibility and incorporate those metrics into decision making. This report guides agencies through that process. The

Advancing Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety: A Primer for Highway Safety Professionals (NHTSA, 2016)

As communities strive to encourage biking and walking, planners and engineers are focusing on designs and programs that improve safety for these users.This primer summarizes the most promising infrastructure treatments and behavioral programs available for addressing specific safety problems and

Trip-making data, TDM, and connectivity in Northern Virginia (SSTI and Michael Baker International, 2016)

Commercially available GPS data offers valuable new insight about trip origins, destinations, and routes, including short trips that travel demand models often cannot capture. Using this data, SSTI worked with Michael Baker International, the Virginia DOT, and local stakeholders to identify

Bikesharing and Bicycle Safety (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2016)

When bike sharing first began, many commentators and critics expressed concern that shared bicycle systems would lead to high crash and injury rates. Bikesharing has some qualities that appear inherently unsafe for bicyclists. Most prominently, helmet usage is documented to be quite low in most

The Business Case for Investment in Public Transportation (APTA, 2016)

While transit has principally been considered the realm of the public-sector, new technologies, service providers, and investment models are building the case for private investment in public transportation. The American Public Transportation Association presents a new report that shows the

Linking Transit Agencies and Land Use Decision Making: Guidebook for Transit Agencies (TRB, 2016)

Land use decisions play a key role in shaping the long-term success of virtually every transit system in the United States. Organizations other than transit agencies hold the responsibility and authority for integrating land use and transit. However, transit agencies can influence the framework

Trip-making and accessibility: New tools, better decisions (SSTI, 2016)

Transportation researchers and practitioners have long sought other tools to complement or perhaps replace conventional methods—tools that would better analyze trips rather than speed at points in the system, speak to non-auto modes of travel, address land use solutions as well as highway