News

Want to increase transit ridership without adding service? Make it easy to get to the stations

By Eric Sundquist As in the United States, many rail transit lines in Sydney, Australia, have imperfect connections to the local street and pedestrian networks. In Sydney, 44 of 178 rail transit stations have entrances on only one side, necessitating long walks for unlucky travelers seeking to

Researcher launches open source accessibility toolbox

By Michael Brenneis and Chris McCahill DOTs and planning agencies interested in measuring access to destinations have a growing number of packages and data sources to choose from. Folks not looking to reinvent the wheel are turning to shiny products like Citilabs’ Sugar Access, Conveyal, and

Los Angeles and San Francisco using data to target Vision Zero efforts

By Robbie Webber As cities commit to Vision Zero, they have started to examine intersections and roadway segments with high crash rates, serious injuries, and fatalities to pedestrians. What they have found is that a small percent of roadways account for a large portion of serious crashes. And

What’s the best policy for managing spillover parking?

By Chris McCahill A new study in Transportation Research Part B suggests that while minimum and maximum parking requirements can be effective in some ways at managing spillover parking, they are anything but a one-size-fits-all approach. Using economic models, researchers tested the effects of

Neighborhood walkability and residential preferences in midsized cities

By Saumya Jain Many studies have established a significant relationship between walkable neighborhoods and impacts on health and travel behaviors. In the past, most of these studies were based on large metropolitan areas with significant variability in built environment and residential options. A

Small increases in rainfall could cause big problems for road networks

By Rayla Bellis There is a lot we still don’t know about how climate change will affect transportation networks and how to make infrastructure more resilient, but new research sheds some light on these questions. A model developed to study the impacts of floods on road networks indicates that

Dense areas are safer but road design is critical

By Chris McCahill Dense development patterns offer important safety benefits, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania, but high-speed roads in dense suburban centers are deadly for pedestrians. This new study confirms what others have already shown—that attention to

Quantifying the quality and connectivity of sidewalks: walking accessibility indices

By Saumya Jain The May 2019 issue of the Institute of Traffic Engineers journal was focused on healthy and sustainable transportation solutions. With the constant rise in obesity numbers and health concerns, planners and designers around the world are trying to bring back physical activity in

Latinos are being pushed to urban edges, rural areas with few transportation options

By Robbie Webber A study by researchers at UT Health San Antonio details the barriers that Latinos in the U.S. face because of poor access to transportation options. Inadequate transit options, unreliable or spotty schedules, long commutes, and a geographic mismatch between jobs and affordable

Yet more evidence: “If you build it they will drive”

By Eric Sundquist There’s new evidence, from academia and a prominent real-world case, that ever-expanding highway capacity is a futile strategy for reducing congestion. First, the specific example: Eight years ago Southern Californians famously endured “Carmageddon,” a temporary closure on