News

The relationship between bus stop amenities, ridership, and paratransit demand

By Saumya Jain Can improvements in the amenities at individual transit stops both increase bus ridership and decrease the demand for paratransit? Apparently so, as a study from the University of Utah shows. Between 2013-2016, the Utah Transportation Authority invested in improving infrastructure

Cyclists at elevated risk of injury over non-active commuters

By Michael Brenneis From the UK comes more evidence that improving cycling infrastructure has the potential to advance health. A new paper in the BMJ concludes that while commuting by bicycle has more risk of injury than commuting by non-active modes, active commuting offers substantial benefits

VMT ticks up again in 2019

By Eric Sundquist Driving mileage in the United States climbed by just under 0.9 percent in 2019. On a per capita basis, the increase was just under 0.6 percent. The VMT figures come from FHWA’s latest Travel Volume Trends release. The per capita figure is 2 percent below the peak historic

Transit also in need of federal stimulus support

By Eric Sundquist Pictures of parked airplanes and dire warnings from airlines seem to have dominated the coronavirus-stimulus conversation around transportation. But just as the bottom has fallen out of the of the air travel market, so it has for local and regional transit and intercity rail

Commuters won’t drive far to access park-and-ride

By Chris McCahill People using park-and-ride (PNR) stations don’t seem to mind a longer overall commute, according to new research, as long as the station is close to home. In other words, it’s probably better to think of park-and-ride lots more like local feeders than as regional access

Neighborhood perspectives on gentrification around light rail in Denver

By Rayla Bellis Recent research in Denver aimed to provide a more nuanced answer to the question of how light rail and transit-oriented development have contributed to gentrification. While previous studies have looked at this issue quantitatively, in this case the researchers analyzed

Sweden and Virginia: Messaging and variable tolls can influence mode choice

By Robbie Webber Two recent studies—one practical and one academic—show two approaches to reducing driving. A Swedish study looked at what types of messages influence the choice to drive, while a report from Virginia shows that tolls on the I-66 corridor outside Washington have made a

Cars park improperly substantially more than scooters or bikes

By Michael Brenneis If media accounts are to be taken at face value, it would seem that micromobility devices, such as scooters and bicycles—sometimes characterized as a “scourge”—are scattered about in the public right- of-way, impeding everyone. Some cities are implementing

Big Data sources for understanding non-motorized travel patterns

By Saumya Jain Researchers from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute recently published a paper that discusses the top sources for individually-acquired pedestrian and bicycle travel data assimilated from a variety of sources. This could help us understand how to solve the complexities of

Dueling congestion reports released

By Eric Sundquist Two reports issued within days provide contrasting takes on the enduring issue of highway traffic congestion. One report from traffic-data firm Inrix is an update of previous scorecards that rank world cities for highway delay, calculated by aggregating travel times slower than