News

Can travel demand models predict cycling?

By Chris McCahill Try asking a conventional travel demand model about bicycle trips and you might get anything from an educated guess to an error message. A recent study from Sweden, however, shows what it takes to fix them. The short answer is to make the models much bigger. That leaves an

Does Uber impact bike-share usage? Evidence from a natural experiment in Budapest

By Rayla Bellis Significant research has gone into understanding the relationships between different urban transportation options and whether they support or compete with each other. It seems reasonable to think ride-hailing services like Uber might compete with bike sharing in urban areas, but

Impact of “new age” shopping behavior on VMT and the environment

By Saumya Jain With the constant increase in retail sales from e-commerce, there have been a number of studies studying the relationship between in-store and online shopping behavior and its impact on retail-related travel. Though few studies suggest that the relationship might be complementary,

Short commutes and multimodal access motivate housing choices

By Chris McCahill In choosing where to live, people strive for a combination of short driving commutes and good transit access, according to a new study spanning three large regions: Atlanta, Seattle, and Detroit. Walkable neighborhoods are also a plus, depending on the region. For this study,

Toward transportation equity

By Michael Brenneis “From redlining to urban renewal to Jim Crow, many communities across North America have been excluded from the decision-making processes that shaped their built environment, and the built environment has in turn cut these groups off from access to opportunity.” say

In Silicon Valley, private shuttles not just for tech workers anymore

By Robbie Webber A recent article from Protocol, a newsletter devoted to the tech industry, details the twin and intertwined problems of very long commutes and the lack of adequate housing in Silicon Valley. Most of us have heard of the so-called “Google buses”—private shuttles run by tech

The argument for ending single-family zoning

By Rayla Bellis An article in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Planning Association makes a case for getting rid of single-family zoning in U.S. cities. The authors, professors at UCLA’s Department of Urban Planning, argue that single-family zoning (often called “R1” zoning)

The incompatibility of Vision Zero and VMT growth

By Eric Sundquist The U.S. transportation field has tried many things to reduce traffic crashes, fatalities, and injuries: drunk-driving and seatbelt laws; in-vehicle safety improvements; wide, straight roads with crash zones; graduated licensing; and more. Yet traffic crashes still kill

Using Big Data for estimating VMT and reliable travel patterns

By Saumya Jain For the longest time we’ve relied on the Highway Performance Monitoring System for understanding travel patterns and estimating vehicle miles of travel. But these estimates often have not been very accurate because of inadequacies in data collection. Big data is providing more

The shifting geography of sprawl

By Michael Brenneis Sprawl appears to be decreasing in North America. That is, new development is adding to the share of gridded or connected streets in the street network. However, in other parts of the world, new development is increasingly taking the form of gated communities, cul-du-sacs, and