News

Study finds risky driving still a problem around schools

By Saumya Jain Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among school children. Although some cities and schools that have implemented safety programs around schools have seen decreases in dangerous driving in school zones, those improvements have been more than offset by worsening driver

States may look to leaders in regulating electric bicycles

By Brian Lutenegger Electric bicycles (e-bikes) are becoming more popular as more options become available. So far, ten states have updated their laws to reflect this trend and accommodate the technology. An additional 20 states have defined e-bikes but have not fully defined their operation

Do mileage-based congestion fees hit low-income drivers harder?

By Chet Edelman While there is mounting evidence that demand-based pricing—or congestion tolling—can more efficiently manage highway use, serious concerns continue to arise regarding the system’s disproportionate impacts on low-income drivers. However, a recent study by researchers at

Houston paper: Metro area worst in nation for traffic fatalities, speeding at fault

By Robbie Webber Reporters from the Houston Chronicle looked at 16 years of national data for traffic fatalities, and they were shocked by the statistics for their area. Houston has the deadliest overall traffic safety record for the 12 largest metro areas studied, and ranks in the top half in

Speeding up buses with automated enforcement

By Michael Brenneis Transit-exclusive lanes can speed buses or other transit vehicles and make the services more appealing and predictable. But those nearly-empty lanes can seem appealing to the drivers of private vehicles stuck in traffic or looking for short-term parking or loading, so keeping

Webinar recap: How TDOT is attracting and retaining staff

By Rayla Bellis Many state DOTs around the country are currently grappling with the question of how to attract and retain a talented workforce. On the one hand, they are facing an upcoming wave of retirements that could mean a major loss of institutional knowledge. At that same time, they are

Back to the new normal? Post-recession VMT uptick wanes

By Eric Sundquist In the second half of the 20th century, as the nation rapidly suburbanized, it was pretty easy to predict how much driving Americans would do. United States vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) rose steadily year-by-year, with only temporary blips around fuel shortages or recessions. In

Among other barriers, low-wage workers face discrimination based on commute distance

By Michael Brenneis Along with lack of access to transportation options in areas outside the urban core, low-wage workers also face another obstacle in finding work. Discrimination by commute distance is significant when applying for low-wage jobs, concludes a new study. Affluence and long

Aging Boomers could cause transportation shakeup

By Chris McCahill Suburban Baby Boomers hoping to age in place are beginning to put new demands on our transportation system, according to a recent New York Times article. Once they can no longer drive, many older folks find themselves needing in-home services or drivers that can offer more

Technical assistance helped six MPOs improve how they prioritize projects

By Rayla Bellis Transportation agencies around the country are seeking more performance-driven approaches for prioritizing investments. We now have better tools than ever before for assessing outcomes from transportation investments in order to put scarce dollars to their highest and best value.