News

Places with most crash exposure also fear enforcement bias

By Eric Sundquist Low-income and minority Americans face a dilemma: They are disproportionately victimized by our transportation system. And while law enforcement could help, those same Americans are subject to profiling and fines that can lead to economic ruin. SSTI’s mid-November Community of

LOS to play more limited role in California planning, according to survey

By Chris McCahill A new survey of planning officials in California finds that most are embracing the shift from highway level of service to vehicle miles traveled for evaluating the environmental impacts of new development projects. While some are ditching LOS altogether, however, many still rely

How might travelers behave with privately-owned AVs?

By Michael Brenneis In many ways, we can only speculate about a future with autonomous vehicles on the road. The effects on vehicle miles traveled are expected to be very different if AVs are privately owned versus shared. A recent post by Aaron Gordon on Jalopnick drew our attention to a

App cuts double parking by delivery drivers in DC

by Robbie Webber Like many cities, Washington, DC, has a problem with double parking and delivery vehicles blocking crosswalks and bus and bike lanes. One experiment in curb management showed good results during its trial run from August to October. Using the curbFlow app, delivery drivers can

Why didn’t the turtles cross the road?

By Rayla Bellis A study from Ohio University evaluating the impacts of a new bypass on Eastern Box Turtles found unexpected results: turtles living next to the bypass did not exhibit heightened stress levels, but not one of them crossed the road over a two year period, including via a

License-plate readers pose threats to equity and privacy

By Eric Sundquist Automated license-plate readers (ALPRs) and associated software have become inexpensive go-tos for law enforcement and toll collection. They also raise questions about equity and ethics. Axon Enterprises, a vendor of law-enforcement cameras and other devices, has set up an

Nighttime pedestrian fatalities soar

By Robbie Webber Although we are now past Halloween—the night of the year with the highest number of pedestrian crashes—we still have work to do on improving the safety of walking at night. While other crash types have gone down, pedestrian and bicycle crashes continue to rise, and crashes

Is there bias in GPS enabled smartphone cycling app data?

By Michael Brenneis Smartphones with GPS tracking ability are capable of collecting large amounts of pedestrian and cyclist movement data. But do tracking apps developed largely for athletic or route-planning use capture the big picture of where pedestrians and cyclists travel and what

Residential exposure to local traffic emissions associated with higher risk of stroke

By Yicong Yang A recent study finds that long-term residential exposure to locally emitted black carbon (BC)—primarily from traffic exhaust—is associated with higher stroke incidence. BC comprises a significant portion of particulate matter. Although BC is a known health hazard with health

Priced parking is fair and effective at lowering car use

By Chris McCahill New research out of California looks at the effect of priced parking on commuter mode choice and transportation costs for low-income households. Findings from two studies suggest raising the price of commuter parking by 10 percent could lower car use by as much as three