Modern Mitigation: A Demand-Centered Approach (SSTI, September 2018)

SF TDM measures

This report proposes a new approach to assessing and responding to land use-driven transportation impacts, called “modern mitigation.” Instead of relying on auto capacity improvements as a first resort, this approach builds on practice around transportation demand management (TDM) to make traffic reduction the priority. Based on programs dating to the 1990s in several cities, a modern mitigation program requires certain new land uses to achieve TDM credits. Read More >

U.S. cities and developers beleaguered by too much parking, Mortgage Bankers report finds

Des moines parking

There are 83,141 households in the city of Des Moines, and 1.6 million parking stalls. Even allowing that some of those stalls are occupied by commuters, that’s a pretty staggering disparity. And even accounting for commuters, peak parking occupancy rates are only 65 percent downtown. These are some of the eye-opening findings from a new Mortgage Bankers Association report on parking supply in American cities. The report argues that localities should do their own parking inventories rather than rely on rules of thumb for parking needs and risk squandering resources. Read More >

Accessibility in practice (SSTI and Virginia Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment, 2017)

VirginiaBeach_jobs_transit_change_noLegend

Planning agencies and transportation decision makers often talk about the importance of improving access to destinations, but they rarely have the tools or resources to measure accessibility and incorporate those metrics into decision making. This report guides agencies through that process. Read More >


FEATURED RESOURCE

Connecting Sacramento

Connecting Sacramento is the first study to incorporate both accessibility analysis and tripmaking data, including data from multiple sources, and assess how they can be used together to guide transportation- and land use-related decisions. This study focused specifically on opportunities to improve first- and last-mile connections to light rail transit in Sacramento, but its findings are widely applicable. More Resources...

NEWS

How do we prepare for the “hockey stick growth” of the EV market?

The latest forecasts by Bloomberg show the current sales of electric vehicles increasing from 1 million worldwide, to 11 million in 2025, and then surging to 30 million in 2030. Many other forecasts come very close, and a recent report by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory describes the future market of EVs as following a ‘hockey stick growth’ pattern. Are U.S. electric utilities, regulators, and the infrastructure ready for this change? Read More >

New study details non-emission particulates

Greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles deserve a lot of attention, but particulates from vehicles are also a significant health concern. Tiny soot particles can be inhaled deeply into the lungs. Larger-sized particles can contaminate nearby fields and groundwater, and deliver a significant dose of microplastics to surface waters. Of the microplastic particles polluting surface waters, 30 percent originate from tire wear, according to new research by German and U.S. scientists. Read More >

Traffic death rates stabilize as Americans ease off driving

Traffic fatalities held steady around 37,000 in 2017, following a 14 percent jump over the previous two years, and 2018 is on track for a similar number according to new data from NHTSA and the National Safety Council. Once again, this points to the most consistent cause of high death rates in the U.S.—the amount we drive. Read More >

Study finds rich and poor most likely to walk

As a percentage of all commutes, walking accounts for less than three percent of all trips in the United States. But not all groups in the country walk at the same rate. A new study from the University of Virginia reveals that a distinct socioeconomic divide exists; walking rates are noticeably greater among high- and low-income adults compared to middle-income individuals—a pattern that holds for all trip purposes and levels of land use density. Read More >

Planners reevaluate parking requirements for affordable housing

The most recent issue of Planning, the magazine of the American Planning Association, examines how cutting parking requirements can also improve the supply of affordable housing. Both cities and developers are recognizing that new projects may require significantly fewer spaces in the future as people eschew car ownership in favor of transit, ridesharing, carsharing, and non-motorized transportation options. Several cities have found that by reducing the requirements for expensive parking in buildings, the cost for the residential units is also reduced. Read More >

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