Modernizing Mitigation: A Demand-Centered Approach (SSTI, September 2018)

SF TDM measures

This report proposes a new approach to assessing and responding to land use-driven transportation impacts, called “modern mitigation.” Instead of relying on auto capacity improvements as a first resort, this approach builds on practice around transportation demand management (TDM) to make traffic reduction the priority. Based on programs dating to the 1990s in several cities, a modern mitigation program requires certain new land uses to achieve TDM credits. Read More >

U.S. cities and developers beleaguered by too much parking, Mortgage Bankers report finds

Des moines parking

There are 83,141 households in the city of Des Moines, and 1.6 million parking stalls. Even allowing that some of those stalls are occupied by commuters, that’s a pretty staggering disparity. And even accounting for commuters, peak parking occupancy rates are only 65 percent downtown. These are some of the eye-opening findings from a new Mortgage Bankers Association report on parking supply in American cities. The report argues that localities should do their own parking inventories rather than rely on rules of thumb for parking needs and risk squandering resources. Read More >

Accessibility in practice (SSTI and Virginia Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment, 2017)

VirginiaBeach_jobs_transit_change_noLegend

Planning agencies and transportation decision makers often talk about the importance of improving access to destinations, but they rarely have the tools or resources to measure accessibility and incorporate those metrics into decision making. This report guides agencies through that process. Read More >


FEATURED RESOURCE

Connecting Sacramento

Connecting Sacramento is the first study to incorporate both accessibility analysis and tripmaking data, including data from multiple sources, and assess how they can be used together to guide transportation- and land use-related decisions. This study focused specifically on opportunities to improve first- and last-mile connections to light rail transit in Sacramento, but its findings are widely applicable. More Resources...

NEWS

Conventional practice fails to account for induced traffic, even when the public demands it

The problem of induced traffic, aka induced demand, is well-documented in the literature. Yet it is too rarely accounted for in practice. A new paper by Jamey M.B. Volker (University of California-Davis) and co-authors examines the environmental documents from five major highway projects to see how they addressed induced traffic. The tl;dr: not well. Read More >

All-way stop signs reduce crashes by one-third

From 2009 to 2016, the Washington, DC, District Department of Transportation converted 60 intersections from two-way stops (allowing free flow on the major route) to all-way stop control. A new study in the Transportation Research Record looks at 53 of those intersections with available data and shows promising safety benefits. Read More >

County wants to make informal paths safer, more formal

Montgomery County, MD, is asking residents to mark the informal paths that they have been using to reach destinations. Many paths are worn through woods, cul-de-sac ends, and beaten into the grass where good pedestrian connections don’t exist. The county is updating its Pedestrian Master Plan, and wants the walking environment to be improved for those who may not want to or be able to negotiate these dirt tracks. Read More >

Recent trends in school travel mode choice

A recent study analyzed trends in travel to school in the U.S. using 2017 National Household Travel Survey Data and explored factors that impact mode choice. Among the findings, the study shows that the share of students walking and biking to school has increased since 2009 and the share of students traveling to school by car has decreased. Read More >

Getting transportation equity right

The American equity conversation has turned to law enforcement, but we know that racism also resides in the history of the built environment, and that current practice is not anti-racist enough to achieve equity. Fortunately, a lot of scholars, reporters, practitioners, and advocates—including many people of color whose voices are urgently worth seeking out in a white-dominated field—have been working to point out the problems and possible solutions. Read More >

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