municipal

AVs, e-commerce will disrupt municipal budgets

By Eric Sundquist The coming of autonomous vehicles and the related increase in e-commerce deliveries promise to change many things: infrastructure, access and mobility, land consumption, emissions, retailing, urban form, and many more. It’s not clear that we will have policy in place to

Red light cameras still popular with municipalities, but not drivers

By Mary Ebeling Automobile drivers almost universally agree that red light running is unacceptable and dangerous, but many also admit being guilty of it. Almost half the states allow red light cameras and municipalities are increasingly installing red light cameras at intersections as tools to

Rahm Emanuel orders Chicago employees to use public transit

In an effort to crack down on the city’s generous travel reimbursement policy, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel introduced a measure that forces city employees to use public transit for work-related travel. Under the new program, employees who need to travel for meetings or assignments must use

Saving money on health care: Chicago to institute new wellness plan for city employees

In a time of increasingly tight municipal budgets, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced a wellness plan for city employees that will use incentives to save up to $240 million in health costs over the next four years. Following a model used in private industry for some time, the City will soon

The allure and price of “greenfield economics”

In a recent series of articles, Aaron Renn provides some fascinating insights into the initial economic advantages of suburban expansion and the long-term costs of such development. Initial economic advantages for new suburbs constructed on undeveloped land include: All construction is new and

City of Chicago to save $400,000 by using Zipcars

Chicago joins New York in switching to car-sharing for some of its transportation needs. Under the agreement that Chicago signed with Zipcar in March, the City will pay an hourly rate of $5.95 for use of a vehicle, which includes fuel, maintenance, and insurance. The city expects that this will

Pay by the Snowflake?

Governing.com writer Andy Kim described a pilot snow-removal program in the city of Quincy, Mass that used pay for performance: “The city’s Department of Public Works awarded a contract to a snow-removal company that pays per inches of snow plowed, rather than the standard pay scheme based on

From the Community of Practice

A new presentation from the Pennsylvania borough of Carlisle shows the approach of a smaller municipality to Smart Transportation.  The Power Point can be downloaded here: [PPT]